Our Online Courses and Certificates

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About the courses: Our continuing education courses are available to clinicians, coaches, and educators interested in learning about psychology related topics such as biofeedback. They are all in distance / home learning, format including pre-recorded audiovisual lectures, movies, readings in texts, and frequent interactions with the instructor. Students work at their own paces and have up to a year after the date of purchase to complete a course. All course material is accessed from the course web site so people interested in our courses must have consistent access to the internet.

These are distance learning courses (rather than self-directed learning courses) as there is substantial interaction between the faculty and student. Distance education refers to instruction delivered to students who are separated from their instructor and in support of regular and substantive interaction between them, whether in real time or through time delay.  Substantial interaction is where a student and a faculty participate in back and forth discussions on an educational topic. These are continuing education, not university accredited, courses.

NO CDs or other materials are mailed to students. All materials are on the course web sites.
How you learn: Our students learn by attending both pre-recorded lectures and live – real time – classes with instructors during which students and instructors can see and hear each other. It’s almost like being there in person. They read texts as well.

This is what a live class looks like

The “screen shot” to the right shows an instructor and three students interacting in real time while looking at discussion material on their screens.

This is what a “prerecorded” lecture looks like: Just follow the link to see it  http://youtu.be/9xpEpAZOHtI

CE Credit : Saybrook University is regionally accredited and approved by the state of California to grant degrees. The Behavioral Medicine R&T Foundation is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Foundation maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
Course completion certificates:  Students receive a personalized course completion certificate upon successful completion of a course. The certificate indicates how many CEs were earned, the topic of the course, the presenting organization and the organizations which have accredited / approved the program.

Purchasing courses: Courses can be purchased by credit card or by check. To purchase courses via credit card, go to the name of the course below and click on it. The brief course summary will appear. If you are interested, click the link at the end of the description and you will be taken to the full course description and a link to our secure ordering site. To pay by check, send the check in US Funds written to Saybrook University to the web site header address.

There are no refunds once access has been given to the course web site.

Scholarships: All full time graduate students from anyplace in the world and all professionals from developing nations automatically receive 25% off the cost of each course. It is up to these people to inform us by email at rsherman@nwinet.com of their status.

FOR BRIEF DESCRIPTIONS Of EACH COURSE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAM:

Continue down the page to see brief descriptions of each course. From there, you can follow a link to the full description and the ordering site.

To go directly to a specific course or certificate program, click on the course name below.

To return to this list, click:

Oval: Click to return to course list

 

 

 

 

A.  Current Course List:


1. General Biofeedback / Psychophysiological assessment and intervention – 50 hours of CE credit, $750. Taught by Richard A. Sherman, Ph.D.

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures and readings. You can start anytime and work with the instructor via e-mail for up to one year. Extensive personal attention to your individual needs and tailoring the course to your proposed uses of biofeedback is a key part of the course package.

Expand your practice to include more types of patients and different disorders. Learn how to do biofeedback, psychophysiological assessments, and the basics of many other behavioral medicine techniques. This is the BCIA required general biofeedback certification course. It provides the basic knowledge needed to perform psychophysiological assessments and interventions including biofeedback. Click here to go to the full course description and to order the course. 

DISCLAIMER:Completion of this continuing education course is strictly for educational / informational purposes and does not imply competency, proficiency, and/or experience. The course completion certificate is not a clinical certification nor a license to practice. 

2. Anatomy and physiology / human biology for behavioral clinicians – 45 hours of CE credit, $750. Taught by Richard A. Sherman, Ph.D. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures and readings. You can start anytime and work with the instructor via e-mail for up to one year. Extensive personal attention.

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Learn enough about how the body works to get a better grasp of the physical bases for your patients’ disorders. Learn how the muscles work together to produce movements so you know what’s normal and what’s not. Be able to communicate better with your medical colleagues and understand their lingo and tests. This course is equivalent to a three credit undergraduate course in A & P / Human Biology and meets BCIA’s requirements for having this course for certification and recertification in biofeedback and neurofeedback. The course covers all the basic areas of A & P but from a behavioral perspective. For example, when we talk about bones, we concentrate on how stress effects healing fractures and reshaping bone structures. When we talk about muscles, we talk about how they work together to produce movements.  Click here to go to the full course description and to order the course.


3. Basic EEG Biofeedback / neurofeedback: – 45 hours of CE credit, $750. Taught by Cynthia Kerson, Ph.D. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures and readings. You can start anytime and work with the instructor via e-mail for up to one year. Extensive personal attention to your individual needs and tailoring the course to your proposed uses of biofeedback is a key part of the course package.

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Expand your practice to include more types of patients and different disorders. Learn how to do EEG biofeedback / neurofeedback. This is the BCIA required EEG biofeedback certification course. It provides the basic knowledge needed to perform EEG biofeedback. After taking this course you will still need to get hands on experience using EEG biofeedback devices before you can add EEG biofeedback to your practice. Contact us about how to get this further training. Click here to go to the full course description and to order the course.

 DISCLAIMER:Completion of this continuing education course is strictly for educational / informational purposes and does not imply competency, proficiency, and/or experience. The course completion certificate is not a clinical certification nor a license to practice.


4. Neuropsychophysiology (Nervous System Functions in Psychophysiology) 45 hours of CE credit, $750. Taught by Gerald Kozlowski, Ph.D. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures and readings. You can start anytime and work with the instructor via e-mail for up to one year.

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!This course covers central and peripheral nervous system anatomy and physiology and finishes with an emphasis on nervous system pathophysiology. This is the course to take after completing a basic course in EEG neurofeedback. It provides advanced information so people performing neurofeedback have a better understanding of brain functioning. The brain/spinal cord plexus is discussed from both anatomical and physiological perspectives concentrating on plasticity in response to changes in the external and internal environment as well as viewing the system as an interactive organ with hormonal, nerve based, and blood flow based feedback and control systems. Psychophysiological recording methodology including EEG and scans such as MEG and PET are examined in relation to their uses in behavioral medicine. Neurological disorders centered on the CNS (such as epilepsy) are discussed in relationship to psychophysiological evaluations and behavioral interventions.  Click here to go to the full course description and to order the course.


5. Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback – 30 hours of CE credit, $500. Taught by Paul Lehrer, Ph.D. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures, readings, and both live and Rounded Rectangle: Order now!email interactions with the instructor. You can start anytime up to three months after purchasing the course and can work with the instructor for up to one year after the purchase date when the course expires. This course meets the requirements for BCIA’s certificate in heart rate variability. It emphasizes methods for evaluation and modification of autonomic quieting through heart rate variability training. Topics covered include (1) Cardiac anatomy and physiology, (2) Respiratory anatomy and physiology, (3) Autonomic nervous system anatomy and physiology, and (4) Heart rate variability psychophysiology, instrumentation, measurement, biofeedback strategies and applications.  Click here to go to the full course description and to order the course.


6. Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Brain Entrainment Techniques – 30 hours of CE credit, $500. Taught by Cynthia Kerson, Ph.D. and Dave Siever. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures, readings, and both live and email interactions with the instructor. You can start anytime up to three months after purchasing the course and can work with the instructor for up to one year after the purchase date when the course expires. This course provides sufficient information on psychophysiological entrainment and stimulation for students to understand how various forms of physical stimulation are used to alter the brain and body’s functioning. Topics include (1) magnetic stimulation of the periphery to induce changes in peripheral blood flow, (2) magnetic stimulation of the brain to induce out of body experiences and control headaches, (3) physiological entrainment of breathing for control of hypertension, (4) Basics of arousal and dysarousal, (5) review of QEEG and HRV in relation to entrainment, (6) Physiology of AVE, (7) Standard Studies on AVE, (8) Cognitive Studies on AVE, (9) CES, (10) tDCS, (11) HRV – breath-work exercise, (12) Programming with the DAVID Session Editor, (13) use of “alphastim”-like devices to alter states of consciousness, and (14) neuromodulation including rTMS, etc.  Click here to go to the full course description and to order the course.


7. Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Quantitative EEG Recording and Analysis – 30 hours of CE credit, $500. Taught by Cynthia Kerson, Ph.D. and Jay Gunkelman. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures, readings, and both live and email interactions with the instructor. You can start anytime up to three months after purchasing the course and can work with the instructor for up to one year after the purchase date when the course expires. Quantitative electroencephalogram (QEEG) has become an important technique for psychophysiological assessment of brain-based disorders. This course covers reading and de-artifacting the EEG record, montages, database comparisons, drug effects on the EEG, frequency analysis, spectral and topographic aspects and basic neuroanatomy and physiology, based upon Brodmann areas and anatomical structures. Click here to go to the full course description and to order the course.


8. Optimal Functioning in Sports, School, & the Workplace through Psychophysiological Assessment and Intervention – 30 hours of CE credit, $510. Taught by Tim Herzog, Ph.D.

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures, readings, and both live and email interactions with the instructor. You can start anytime up to three months after purchasing the course and can work with the instructor for up to one year after the purchase date when the course expires. Effectively performing under pressure in competition, on stage, in school or in various impromptu work settings is unquestionably difficulty for most individuals.  Similarly, working within schools or large organizations to increase work efficiency, decrease accidents, and increase morale while decreasing stress related absences, disorders, and conflicts is a complex task being requested by more and more employers as the impact of job stress becomes more apparent. Optimal performance in these environments is difficult but achievable with appropriate training. The research supporting the efficacy of such efforts is reviewed and the typical techniques for interventions with diverse groups are illustrated. Click here to go to the full course description and to order the course.


9. Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Ethics for Biofeedback Providers (Ethics for People Doing Biofeedback) 5 CE credits, $150. Taught by Richard A. Sherman, Ph.D. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures and readings. You can start anytime and work at your own pace for up to one year. This APA approved course is intended for clinicians, educators, and coaches who have incorporated or are interested in incorporating biofeedback (including neurofeedback) intervention and psychophysiological assessment techniques into their practices. It emphasizes issues in ethics and professional conduct which are of special interest to clinicians incorporating biofeedback – many of which are not clearly spelled out in typical codes of ethics and conduct promulgated by clinical organizations. Participants attend three audiovisual lectures (hear the instructor’s voice while watching slides), read text files, and interact with the instructor via e-mail. At the end of the course, participants answer a set of short essay questions covering key concepts in the course. No text is required for this course. Click here to go to the full course description and to order the course.


10.  Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Pain Assessment and Intervention for Behavioral Clinicians – 45 hours of CE credit, $750. Taught by Richard A. Sherman, Ph.D. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures and readings. You can start anytime and work with the instructor via e-mail for up to one year. Extensive personal attention.

This course describes the physiological and psychophysiological mechanisms underlying acute and chronic pain. It then explains the common behavioral assessment and interventional strategies (relaxation training, biofeedback, cognitive restructuring, etc.) for both headache and pain. The course also delves into typical pharmacological, surgical, and alternative (hypnosis, massage, chiropractic, therapeutic touch, etc.) approaches to pain evaluation and control. By the end of the course, participants should be sufficiently familiar with the typical approaches to pain assessment and control used in the medical community so the participant will know how behavioral treatments and assessments fit into the overall program and to permit good communication with medical colleagues around pain related issues. Sample protocols for treatment of migraine and tension headache as well as upper and lower back pain are detailed and provided. Click here to go to the full course description and to order the course.

 DISCLAIMER:Completion of this continuing education course is strictly for educational / informational purposes and does not imply competency, proficiency, and/or experience. The course completion certificate is not a clinical certification nor a license to practice. 


11.  Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Behavioral Assessment & Treatment of Pelvic Floor Disorders – 45 hours of CE credit, $750. Taught by Richard A. Sherman, Ph.D. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures and readings. You can start anytime and work with the instructor via e-mail for up to one year. Extensive personal attention.

This course provides a basic understanding of pelvic floor functions and structures along with clinical etiologies of pelvic floor disorders, including urinary, bowel, and pain problems, treated by behavioral interventions. It provides detailed rationales, supporting documentation, and clinical protocols for behavioral interventions so health care providers have the knowledge base needed to provide these interventions to their clients within their scopes of practice and expertise after the providers gain hands-on experience by working with experienced practitioners. If you are only interested in working with adults having urinary and fecal incontinence, instead of taking this course you may want to take our course “behavioral interventions for adult urinary and fecal incontinence”. Click here to go to the full course description and to order the course.

DISCLAIMER:Completion of this continuing education course is strictly for educational / informational purposes and does not imply competency, proficiency, and/or experience. The course completion certificate is not a clinical certification nor a license to practice. 

12.  Hypnosis in psychophysiology  – 45 hours of CE credit, $750. Taught by Eric Willmarth, Ph.D. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures and readings. You can start anytime and work with the instructor via e-mail for up to one year.

NOT AVAILABLE.

The standard techniques of Clinical Hypnosis are described and students are taught the elements of their application. Uses of hypnotic techniques with specific types of patients and integration of these techniques into other behavioral medicine interventions are discussed. It is the intent of this course to 1. Provide students with a basic background and appreciation of the history of clinical hypnosis and provide and introduction to a variety of current theories of the mechanisms of hypnosis. 2. Provide students with sufficient knowledge to understand pertinent legal and ethical considerations related to the use of clinical hypnosis, and 3. Provide an overview of the empirically validated uses of hypnosis. An optional in-person training session is available at extra cost to provide students with fundamental skills needed to induce a hypnotic state to make clinical use of the hypnotic condition in a variety of situations.

DISCLAIMER:Completion of this continuing education course is strictly for educational / informational purposes and does not imply competency, proficiency, and/or experience. The course completion certificate is not a clinical certification nor a license to practice. 


13.  Neuromuscular Reeducation in Biofeedback – 45 hours of CE credit, $750. Taught by Susan Middaugh, PT, Ph.D. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures and readings. You can start anytime and work with the instructor via e-mail for up to one year. NOT AVAILABLE

This course teaches the elements of kinesiological movement science and how control of movement is distorted by different clinical conditions. The course includes the elements of (a) trigger point, (b) posture, and (c) motor control / coordination assessment. Methods for using psychophysiological recording techniques for assessment of movement related disorders and postural problems are illustrated. The impact of poor posture and improper sequencing of muscle motions as well as of improper levels of tension on development and sustainment of various pain problems such as tension headaches and low back pain are discussed. Techniques for using sEMG biofeedback and other psychophysiological techniques to correct these problems are illustrated.

DISCLAIMER:Completion of this continuing education course is strictly for educational / informational purposes and does not imply competency, proficiency, and/or experience. The course completion certificate is not a clinical certification nor a license to practice. 


14.   Biological basis of behavior / Introduction to psychophysiology – 45hours of CE credit, $750. Taught by Richard A. Sherman, Ph.D. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures and readings. You can start anytime and work with the instructor via e-mail for up to one year. Extensive personal attention.

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Learn the real basics of how the mind and body work together to produce behavior – and where the interactions go wrong. This course provides the basics of how the mind and body work together. It includes behavioral genetics, research techniques, psychophysiology of behaviors such as eating and drinking, respiration, pain, etc. Click here to go to the full course description and to order the course.


15. Research Techniques for Clinicians – 45 hours of CE credit, $750. Taught by Richard A. Sherman, Ph.D. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures and readings. You can start anytime and work with the instructor via e-mail for up to one year. Extensive personal attention.

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!This is a course in self-defense for clinicians who need to know how to assess the clinical literature and folklore to decide whether to try a new technique or believe in new treatments. It also teaches clinicians how to assess their own work to insure that it is optimally efficacious. The course material includes the book “research for clinicians”.

16.   Introduction to Behavioral and Alternative Medicine – 45 CEs, $750 Taught by Richard A. Sherman, Ph.D. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures and readings. You can start anytime and work with the instructor via e-mail for up to one year. Extensive personal attention.

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!

Complimentary and alternative (C & A) practices, including those which form the core of  “behavioral medicine” are rapidly finding acceptance within the clinical community. Simultaneously, “accepted” practices are falling from favor as they are shown to be ineffective or even counterproductive. Patients now visit as many or more “alternative” providers as traditional providers and are spending billions of dollars on attempts to get care not available from the traditional medical community.  This course is intended to acquaint you with many of those practices which may become the new standard of care in the near future. It is also intended to help you learn to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the claims made by the proponents of these practices so you can more readily separate the real knowledge from the emotional advertising.


17. Neuropsychology of Dreams and Dreaming – 45 CEs $750, taught by Jacquie Lewis, PhD Co-Director, Dream Studies Certificate Program, Saybrook University jlewis@saybrook.edu

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!

Welcome to one of the most fascinating areas of investigation in consciousness studies; few if any other areas bring together in one place as many aspects of neuropsychology. In this course you will learn more than brain physiology and theories of how brain function is connected to nighttime dreaming; you will also obtain a bird’s eye view of the mind and the brain working together, as beautifully exemplified in the exquisitely complex yet simple action of the sleeping brain.


18.   Personal Mythology and Dream Psychology 45 CEs $750, taught by Jacquie Lewis, PhD Co-Director, Dream Studies Certificate Program, Saybrook University jlewis@saybrook.edu

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!In this course you will learn what is meant by the term personal mythology. You will be introduced to the idea that every person develops a particular personal mythology that guides and influences his or her perceptions, thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. You will be introduced to the primary factors that seem to be responsible for the development of particular personal mythologies, for example, a person’s genetic inheritance, family of origin, kinship group, and social milieu.


19.   Understanding and Appreciating Dreams 45 CEs $750, taught by Jacquie Lewis, PhD Co-Director, Dream Studies Certificate Program, Saybrook University jlewis@saybrook.edu

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Understanding and appreciating dreams offers valuable tools for individuals and groups. Engaging in dreamwork can offer personal insight and spiritual growth. The “grassroots dream movement” has initiated non-clinical uses of dream reports for purposes of creative expression, spiritual development, and/or group exploration. This course covers the use of recalled dreams in both clinical and non-clinical settings. It spans a variety of ideological perspectives, emphasizing those that can be quickly learned and adroitly applied with minimal risk and maximum benefit to the dreamer.


20.   Dream Studies Practicum and final paper – 60 CEs, $1,000, taught by Jacquie Lewis, PhD Co-Director, Dream Studies Certificate Program, Saybrook University jlewis@saybrook.edu

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Note that this course is only available to people who have taken the other three dream courses described above. The practicum and final paper are designed to give you a theoretical, experiential, cross-cultural and research foundation in dream studies. Upon completion students will have skills in multiple domains.

 

B. CE Certificate Programs

1. Certificate in Dream Studies

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!The Dream Studies Certificate is designed to help students gain an understanding of important research about dreams and to implement that knowledge in order to accomplish personal and professional goals. Our teaching approach encourages the student to explore personal interests and learn through experience as well as to come to an appreciation of research in the field.

The program consists of three three-credit courses, a three-credit practicum, and a one-credit integrative paper. Three of the required courses are:

Neurological: CSIH 3150: Neuropsychology of Dreams and Dreaming
Experiential: CSIH 3160: Personal Mythology and Dream Psychology
Dreamwork:  CSP3165 Understanding and Appreciating Dreams

2. Certificate of Professional Studies in Psychophysiology –

$7,500 for 5 CE courses and a capstone paper

Certificate Coordinator: Richard A. Sherman, Ph.D. rsherman@saybrook.edu

Certificate Faculty: Cynthia Kerson, Ph.D., Tim Herzog, Ph.D., Paul Lehrer, Ph.D.

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Saybrook University, in partnership with the Behavioral Medicine Foundation, offers a Certificate of Professional Studies in Psychophysiology to professionals taking five of our courses psychophysiology courses and writing a paper summarizing what they have learned. People wanting to take the certificate must be appropriately trained and credentialed clinicians, educators, or coaches.

This certificate is a valuable way to provide evidence of solid training in psychophysiological techniques and biofeedback. The certificate lists the courses taken, the number of hours of training in each, and the major topics in which training was provided. The training required for the certificate goes well beyond that required for certification in biofeedback by organizations such as the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA) as it demonstrates a far greater depth of knowledge and covers a broader spectrum of behavioral interventions and knowledge than only biofeedback. This is an academic certificate of knowledge rather than a clinical practice certification such as BCIA’s biofeedback certification.

Each course  is between 36 and 50 CEs, provided by distance education, and is approved by both the State of California’s Board of Social Sciences and the APA*.  The required core CE (continuing education) courses for the certificate are (1) PH007 Biological basis of behavior (Introduction to psychophysiology), (2) PH010 General biofeedback (psychophysiological assessment and intervention), and (3) a capstone paper summarizing what has been learned while taking the certificate.

Participants who have already taken a course equivalent to either of the above may substitute any of the psychophysiology CE courses for the one already taken with concurrence of the certificate coordinator. The remaining courses are negotiated between the certificate coordinator and the student.

 Participants who wish to meet the standards for certification by BCIA must have a college level course in anatomy and physiology. Participants who do not have such a course can take our A&P CE course (PH011) as one of the certificate courses as it is designed specifically for people who need A&P to provide behavioral interventions. They may also wish to meet the mentoring requirement by taking our mentoring CE course (PH___). Different versions of the course are available depending on whether the participant is interested in certification in general biofeedback, EEG biofeedback (neurofeedback), or pelvic floor disorders biofeedback. Participants taking the mentoring course must have access to an appropriate biofeedback device and be available to work with the instructor for a minimum of one hour per week via the web based program “go to meeting”.

While participants can take any CE course offered by the Psychophysiology Specialization (with concurrence by the certificate coordinator), those most likely to be taken in addition to the core courses are:

a. EEG biofeedback / neurofeedback.

b. Advanced neurofeedback for specific disorders.

c. Psychophysiological optimal functioning in the sports, business, and educational environments.

d. Quantitative EEG assessment.

e. Genetic bases of behavior.

f.  Brain stimulation for behavioral modification.

g. Mentoring in applying psychophysiological techniques.

h. Hormonal and perceptual influences upon behavior.

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C.  CE courses to be added in August, 2015

  1. Mentoring in General Biofeedback, Pelvic muscle disorders biofeedback or Neurofeedback – 45 hours of CE credit, $750 Taught by Cynthia Kerson, Ph.D. and Richard A. Sherman, Ph.D.  This course meets the mentoring requirements for certification set by the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA). The course has three options for mentoring. One is in neurofeedback, the second is in pelvic floor disorders, and the third is in general biofeedback. Students wishing mentoring in more than one topic must purchase an additional course. Training is conducted via “go to meeting” so students must have (a) a computer with a video-camera and microphone connected to the web at a high enough speed to stream video (b) access to appropriate biofeedback equipment, and (c) have completed a didactic course which meets BCIA’s requirements for the topic in which they wish to be mentored. Students can start anytime up to three months after purchasing the course and can work with the instructor for up to one year after the purchase date when the course expires.

2.  Genetic Bases of Human Behavior – 45 Hours of CE Credit, $750. Taught by Richard A. Sherman, Ph.D. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures, readings, and both live and email interactions with the instructor. You can start anytime up to three months after purchasing the course and can work with the instructor for up to one year after the purchase date when the course expires. This course covers the mechanisms through which behaviors are selected for and inherited as well as the extent to which genetics underlies many of our behaviors.

3.  Advanced Neurofeedback: interventions for specific disorders – 45 hours of CE Credit, $750. Taught by Cynthia Kerson, Ph.D. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures, readings, and both live and email interactions with the instructor. You can start anytime up to three months after purchasing the course and can work with the instructor for up to one year after the purchase date when the course expires. This course covers neurofeedback interventions for disorders such as ADHD, drug and alcohol addiction, and epilepsy.

4. Hormonal and perceptual influences upon behavior:  45 Hours of CE Credit, $750. Taught by Gerald Kozlowski, PhD, and Richard A. Sherman, Ph.D. At home learning format based on audiovisual lectures, readings, and both live and email interactions with the instructor. You can start anytime up to three months after purchasing the course and can work with the instructor for up to one year after the purchase date when the course expires. This course covers mechanisms through which hormones and perceptual mechanisms influence our behavior. Topics include Oxitosin’s impact on social behavior, pheromonal influences on mating choices, electromagnetic field influence on vision, etc.

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Full length course descriptions

 

1. Introduction to General Biofeedback

(This the BCIA General Biofeedback Course)

50 CEUs, Course Fee: $750

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Course Concept and Description: This introductory level CE course is the equivalent of a three credit post-licensure course and provides 50 hours of CE credit. The course is targeted to teachers, coaches and licensed / certified clinicians such as psychologists, counselors, physical therapists, social workers, nurses, and physicians as well as to graduate students. Students learn by watching audiovisual lectures, reading assignments both from materials provided on the course web site and standard texts, watching movies which demonstrate equipment & key techniques, and interacting with their instructor via e-mail. They answer short essay questions after each lecture rather than taking exams. Previous students have found that this course takes between 65 and 95 hours of work to perform. Students start the course whenever they wish to within six months of the date of purchase and proceed at their convenience but the course must be completed in one year.

The course provides sufficient material so participants will (a) know the psychophysiological bases for performing the recordings (b) what the common assessments and interventions are as well as how they work, (c) what the common associated interventions are, (d) how the recording devices work in a clinical setting, (d) how to perform an effective recording, and (e) how to perform effective psychophysiological assessments and interventions.  The course meets all of the requirements for the Biofeedback Certification Institute of America’s biofeedback certification course and is approved by them for this purpose. Please note that clinicians interested in being certified in biofeedback by the Biofeedback Certification Institute of America would have to be mentored in treating patients with biofeedback before they could take the certification exam.

Learning objectives: The course objective is to provide the depth of knowledge in psychophysiology, biofeedback equipment, and training techniques which clinicians require to perform psychophysiologically oriented assessments and biofeedback based interventions. This information is crucial to effectively adding these techniques to a clinician’s practice.

This course is designed to help you (the student):

  1. Summarize the psychophysiological processes underlying each condition covered in the course.
  2. Use psychophysiological recording and biofeedback devices to record and display psychophysiological information.
  3. Control the biofeedback display to optimize learning
  4. Use psychophysiological recording equipment to assess patients with specific conditions
  5. Use biofeedback equipment to apply specific interventions tailored to each condition covered in the course.

DISCLAIMER:Completion of this continuing education course is strictly for educational / informational purposes and does not imply competency, proficiency, and/or experience. The course completion certificate is not a clinical certification nor a license to practice. 

Format: Home study supported by e-mail chats after each unit is completed. The lecture portion of the course is presented through a series of audiovisual lectures profusely illustrated by power-point slides and movies. The course is accessed from the course web site. The audiovisual lectures are on power point slides. You will hear the instructor’s voice while viewing the power point sides. The lectures are between 1 ½ and 2 ½ hours in length. Reading assignments parallel the lectures. After watching the lecture and reading the assigned supporting files, you will answer a brief series of short essay review questions (which are in the review questions file on the course web site). The answered questions are then e-mailed to the instructor. You and the instructor will discuss each unit via e-mail chat after your answers are assessed. There is no need to complete the discussion with the instructor before proceeding to the succeeding lecture & chapters. It is expected that all review questions will be answered correctly and completely by the student. Any questions answered incorrectly or incompletely must be discussed and/or corrected. You will have at least one real-time meeting with the instructor via a web based program such as “go to meeting” during which you will interact around your new skills.

How you learn: Our students learn by attending both pre-recorded lectures and live – real time – classes with instructors during which students and instructors can see and hear each other. It’s almost like being there in person. They also read texts and articles.

This is what a live class looks like:

The “screen shot” to the right shows an instructor and three students interacting in real time while looking at discussion material on their screens.

To see what a “prerecorded” lecture looks like, follow this link:  http://youtu.be/9xpEpAZOHtI

Accessibility: Hearing impaired people can view the slides only as virtually all of the material presented in the lectures is typed onto the slides. Visually impaired people can concentrate on the verbal lectures as the slide material is repeated in the lecture accompanying each slide.

Accessing course materials: All course materials are available on the course web site. When you purchase the course, you will be given instructions for accessing the course web site immediately. NO CDs are sent to you.

Computer and Computer Knowledge Requirements:  Anybody with a modern computer and a bit of basic understanding of computer operation (at the level of being able to send e-mails) can play this course with minimal problems. You must have a computer (a) capable of connecting to the internet and running a typical internet program, (b) containing/running a modern word processor such as Microsoft word or Word Perfect, (c) the capability to play sounds such as music (has speakers and appropriate software which normally come with any modern computer), and (d) a slide viewing program such as Power Point (you can probably get a slide viewing program free off the internet if you don’t have one). Any modern (e.g., built within the last ten years), IBM style computer running Windows 98 and more recent platforms (e.g., XP or Windows 8) should be able to do this. Speed, hard disk size, and RAM are not factors for computers in the above category.

Dozens of students have used recent Apple products (MACs etc.) for the course however they frequently have more difficulty playing the course materials than PC users do.

If you are using a MAC type of computer, you must have a current version of “quicktime”. If you do not have it, you can download it for free from the web.

Prerequisites & professional training requirements: The course is far easier for people who have taken undergraduate courses in general biology and general psychology. If you haven’t had them, contact us before registering. You will do much better in the course if you have already taken our “Anatomy and Physiology for Behavioral Clinicians” course.

This course is intended for licensed / certified clinicians, teachers and coaches. None of the instructional material offered will provide you with the clinical skills needed to apply the psychophysiological assessment and interventional techniques you will learn in the clinical environment unless you are already a trained clinician.

Faculty: The course is given by Dr. Richard Sherman, Ph.D.  He is certified by BCIA, approved by BCIA to teach the general biofeedback certification course, and currently teaches A&P, Pelvic floor disorders, pain, and other courses. He is a professional psychophysiologist with extensive training (his Ph.D. is in biology & psychology), has nearly 30 years of experience in the field, and has published over 130 books, chapters, and articles (mostly in peer reviewed journals). Dr. Sherman is Director of the psychophysiology doctoral specialization at Saybrook University and has held many positions within the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback including president. Full CV available upon request and on the course web site.

Strongly Recommended Texts: The cost of the recommended texts is not included in the course fee. No text is absolutely required for the course because most of the text of the following Pain Assessment book is on the course web site. Students are strongly urged to purchase one of the recommended texts. Your instructor can help you make the choice.

a. Pain Assessment and Intervention from a Psychophysiological Perspective by Richard A. Sherman, published by AAPB 2012. An electronic version of the book is on the course web site.  If you want a combined print/CD version, you can order from AAPB’s bookstore (800 477-8892).

b. Biofeedback: A Practitioner’s guide. Edited by Mark Schwartz and Frank Andrasik. Guilford Press of New York, 2003.  Discounted purchase available through AAPB’s bookstore (800 477-8892). The 4th edition is due out in Nov 15.

Optional Texts (Especially for people intending to take the BCIA exam):

a. Introduction to Surface Electromyography by Jeffrey R. Cram and Glenn S. Kasman with Jonathan Holtz. Aspen, Gaithersburg, Maryland, 1998.

b. Clinical Applications in Surface Electromyography – Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain by Glenn S. Kasman, Jeffrey R. Cram, and Steven L. Wolf. Aspen, Gaithersburg, Maryland 1998.

Very optional text only for those who intend to do brain wave (EEG) biofeedback:

Getting Started with Neurofeedback by John N. Demos. WW Norton & Company, NY, 2005.  Discounted purchase available through AAPB’s bookstore (800 477-8892).

NOTE: I urge you to take the Foundation’s EEG Biofeedback / Neurofeedback course before actually doing neurofeedback.

Course Contents / Order of Lectures and Readings: (Note that there are 28 required lectures)

After listening to each lecture, do the assigned reading, watch the assigned movies, and follow along in the pain text.

The numbered items include review questions students must answer to receive credit for the   course.

Note that in accordance with BCIA requirements, this course includes at least the following number of hours of education in the following topics scattered through all of the lectures: (a) 4 hours of introduction to / history of applied psychophysiology and biofeedback, (b) 4 hours of stress, coping & illness, (c) 8 hours of psychophysiological recording information, (d) 8 hours of SEMG applications, (e) 8 hours of ANS applications, (f) 4 hours of EEG applications, (g) 8 hours of introduction to standard adjunctive techniques, and (h) 4 hours of professional conduct/ethics.

Administrative introduction  (View slide set 1.) –  no questions

1. Basic concepts and Credibility (View slide sets 2 and 3 then read the text files BFB psychophysiological recording, BFB Rehabilitation   Chapter; BFB Rules for establishing credibility and either listen to or read the slides from the “BFBV intro to BFB” lecture.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

2. Stress and disease (View slide set 4 then read the text files BFB psychophysiology of stress responses, BFB Heart & Stress.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

3. Electricity, Muscles, and SEMG (View slide set 5; Read text file “BFB muscle type vs. function”.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

4. Development and nerves (View slide set 6.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

5. Pain 1: Referred pain, EEG, and blood flow (View slide set 7 & read BFB SEMG & Pain review as well as BFB p100.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

6. Pain 2: Headache (View slide set 8.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

7. Pain 3: Low back pain, trigger points (View slide set 9.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

8. Recording 1: Equipment overview (View slide set 10, read the text files (a) BFB effects of medications on signals as well as (b) BFB equipment decisions, and watch movie 1.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

9.  Recording 2: SEMG (View slide set 11.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

10. Recording 3: GSR, respiration, Heart Rate, Heart Rate Variability (View slide set 12.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

11. Recording 4: Temperature, and EEG (View slide set 13 then read BFB Drugs & EEG signal.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

12. Assessment 1: Interviews and tracking changes (View slide set 14.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

13.  Assessment 2: Psychophysiological profiles (View slide set 15, read BFB psychophysiological profile table, & watch movies 2 and 3.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

14. Assessment 3: Low back pain and headaches (View slide set 16, read BFB headache log, BFB headache protocol, & view movies 4, 5, & 6.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

15. Assessment 4: Phantom Pain & Pelvic floor (View slide set 17 and view movies 7, 8, 9, & 10)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor)

16. Assessment 5: Norms and habituation (View slide set 18).

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

17. Associated techniques: Relaxation training, meditation, cognitive restructuring, etc.

(View slide set 19 & read BFB aches & pain exercise program, BFB relaxation exercise, BFB Exercise effects on mood, BFB focused breathing exercise.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

18. Treatment 1: Techniques overview, model protocol (View slide set 20 & read BFB efficacy overview.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

19. Treatment 2: Muscle and blood flow related problems (View slide set 21 & read BFB TMD Rx review.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

20 Treatment 3 & 4: Pelvic floor interventions 1 and 2 (View slide sets 22 & 23 then & read treatment of UI review, BFB UI protocol, BFB UI handout for males, BFB UI handout for males, BFB Anorectal disorders.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

21. Treatment 5 & 6: Anxiety, ADHD, hypertension, irritable bowel syndrome, Raynauds, addiction, etc. (View slide sets 24 & 25 then read BFB EEG vs. placebo for ADHD, BFB EEG for ADHD review, BFB hypertension treatment review.)

(About 2 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

22. Cases and tricks (view slide set 26.)

(About 1 hour including interaction with the instructor.)

23. Ethics (View slide sets 27 & 28 then read the text files (a) BFB patient handouts and consents and  (b)  “BFB BCIA ethics document”.)

(Approximately 4 hours including interaction with the instructor.)

24. Decision Making & Conclusion (view slide set 29) – (Approximately 1 hour.)

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2. Introduction to Anatomy & Physiology / Human Biology for Behavioral Clinicians

45 CEs / Course Fee: $750

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!

Concept:  This course is set at the depth and instructional level of a three credit post-licensure course and provides 45 hours of CE credit. It is intended for psychologists and other behavioral clinicians who have not had previous training in aspects of anatomy and physiology related to how the body and mind interact to control behavior and psychophysiological states.

Each basic physical structure and organ system (including the nervous system) is discussed with regard to both anatomical structures and physiological functions as they change over time and in relation to both the external and internal environment. The main course objective is to provide the depth of knowledge behavioral clinicians require to understand the physical bases for psychophysiological problems and interventions. These must be understood before psychophysiologically oriented assessments and interventions can be effectively added to a behavioral clinician’s practice. The course is also intended to enhance communication with physicians and other medical professionals by providing common concepts, information, and vocabulary essential to understanding the discussion of medical disorders.

Clinicians having differing interests and patient populations take this course so it has been designed so you have slightly different materials available to you depending on what your interests are and the types of patients you see. The depth of knowledge you need on different topics depends on how the physiological bases of your patients’ problems relate to the types of assessments and interventions you provide. If you work in a setting where most of the patients have social interaction and anxiety problems rather than complex medical problems, the required text book will suffice to meet your needs. This level meets all requirements for BCIA certification. The lectures will provide sufficient medical material so you will recognize most of the physiological problems influencing your patients’ behaviors (hormones, respiration, senses, muscles, brain & nerve wiring, etc.). If you work in a setting where many of the patients have medical problems complicating their behavioral problems, or you are using biofeedback to treat medical / physiological problems, or you need to communicate with members of the medical community, understand results of medical tests, etc., an optional clinically oriented book has been provided for you to use in addition to the required book. If you are a health psychologist, a behavioral medicine specialist, or in a graduate program leading to one of these degrees, you should take this option. If you are doing muscular rehabilitation, working with people having muscular dysfunctions, or in a clinical psychophysiology graduate program or track, an optional book emphasizing kinesiology has also been provided.

You will learn by watching audiovisual lectures provided on the course web site, reading assignments both from materials provided on the course web site and one or more standard texts, watching a movie, and interacting extensively with the instructor via e-mail and, if you wish, by phone. You will answer short essay questions after each lecture rather than taking exams. Previous students have required between 45 and 95 hours of work (with a median of 65 hours) to complete this course. There are no prerequisites for this course.

Note to people primarily interested in EEG: Why we don’t give a neuroanatomy- only basic course: The material on neuroanatomy you will learn in our A&P course and our EEG biofeedback / neurofeedback course provides the essential information you need to understand how brain structures and functions impact on EEG biofeedback. Of most importance, typical neuroanatomy courses do NOT include much of the crucial information you need to know about how hormones and other functions influence the brain and can overwhelm anything we do with neurofeedback. People who want more depth in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology should take our advanced psychoneurophysiology course.

Specific Course Objectives: As a result of taking this course, you should be able to:

  1. Be able to discuss functional and structural bases of disorders.
  2. Understand how the muscles function and contribute to functional disorders.
  3. Be able to discuss how immune dysfunction relates to functional disorders.
  4. Be able to predict changes in functional disorders from changes in endocrine system function. Relate pheromonal communication to behavioral changes.
  5. Be able to describe genetic and environmental contributions to observed behaviors.
  6. Have sufficient depth of knowledge of A&P to understand the psychophysiological bases of functional disorders.

Format: Home study supported by e-mail chats after each unit is completed. The course is divided into a series of units based on organ systems. You will progress through each unit by watching an introductory audiovisual lecture on the course web site about an organ system followed by reading one or more chapters in the required book, text files on the course web site, and, if you are using one or more of them, possibly in one of the optional books. After watching the lecture and reading the assigned material, you will answer a brief series of questions located in the review question file on the course web site. The answered questions are then e-mailed to the instructor. You and the instructor will discuss each unit via e-mail or phone after your answers are assessed. You do not have to wait for the discussion to proceed to the succeeding lecture & chapters. You are more than welcome to spend extra time with the instructor discussing topics related to the course and biofeedback in general. The cost of the texts is not included in the course fee.

Accessibility: Hearing impaired people can view the slides only as virtually all of the material presented in the lectures is typed onto the slides. Visually impaired people can concentrate on the verbal lectures as the slide material is repeated in the lecture accompanying each slide.

Computer and Computer Knowledge Requirements:  Anybody with a modern computer and a bit of basic understanding of computer operation (at the level of being able to send e-mails) can play this course with minimal problems. You must have a computer (a) capable of connecting to the internet and running a typical internet program, (b) containing/running a modern word processor such as Microsoft word or Word Perfect, (c) the capability to play sounds such as music (has speakers and appropriate software which normally come with any modern computer), and (d) a slide viewing program such as Power Point (you can probably get a slide viewing program free off the internet if you don’t have one). Any modern (e.g., built within the last ten years), IBM style computer running Windows 98 and more recent platforms (e.g., XP or Windows 8) should be able to do this. Speed, hard disk size, and RAM are not factors for computers in the above category.

Dozens of students have used recent Apple products (MACs etc.) for the course however they frequently have more difficulty playing the course materials than PC users do.

If you are using a MAC type of computer, you must have a current version of “quicktime”. If you do not have it, you can download it for free from the web.

Required Text:  (The cost of the text(s) is not included in the course fee.)

Elaine Marieb: Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology, either the 10th edition (ISBN 10: 0-321-69598-4), 2012 or the soft cover 9th edition (ISBN 10: 0-321-51342-8), 2009. There is also a much less expensive e-book version. A used copy of the soft-cover 8th edition will do if you can get it. Published by Benjamin/Cummings Science Publishers / Addison Wesley Longman of New York. Do not get Marieb’s “Human Anatomy and Physiology” book (without “essentials” in the title) as this is a different book.

Optional Texts:

1. Gary Thibodeau and  Kevin Patton: The Human Body in Health and Disease, either the 3rd edition (ISBN  0-323-01338-4 – soft cover), 2002 or the 4th edition (ISBN 0-323-03162-5) 2005. Published by Mosby (Elsevier Science) of St. Louis, Missouri. This book is important if you assess and treat medical conditions, work in a medical setting, or are taking graduate training in health psychology or behavioral medicine.

2. Clinical Kinesiology for Physical Therapy Assistants, Third Edition by Lynn Lippert; F.A. Davis Company of Philadelphia, 2000.  ISBN 0836-0453x . This book is important if you plan to record moving subjects, work with musculoskeletal rehabilitation patients, or are in a graduate school psychophysiology track or program.

Faculty: The course is given by Dr. Richard Sherman, Ph.D.  He is certified by BCIA, approved by BCIA to teach the general biofeedback certification course, and currently teaches A&P, Pelvic floor disorders, pain, and other courses. He is a professional psychophysiologist with extensive training (his Ph.D. is in biology & psychology), has nearly 30 years of experience in the field, and has published over 130 books, chapters, and articles (mostly in peer reviewed journals). Dr. Sherman is Director of the psychophysiology doctoral specialization at Saybrook University and has held many positions within the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback including president. Full CV available upon request and on the course web site.

Topic Outline:

(All readings in the Thibodeau – Patton and Lippert books are optional.)

1.  Concepts and Overview of the Body’s Organization + First Thoughts About Disease

(About two hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)
Audiovisual lecture:  Why you need to know A & P to perform psychophysiological
assessments and interventions – and what you miss if you don’t know it.
MS Word Text file on the course web site entitled “A&P Basic Concepts of Disease”.
Marieb book Chapter 1: Structural organization, atoms to organisms, overview of organ
systems, what is life and what is needed, homeostasis, descriptive terminology
Thibodeau/Patton 3rd  Edition Chapters 1, 3, and 4 / 4th Edition 1,3, 4, and 5: Structure vs.   function, Organ systems; first look at disease mechanisms. NOTE: See the   appendices for examples of pathological conditions, medical terminology,   clinical   and laboratory values, and common abbreviations and symbols.
Lippert book Chapter 1: Descriptive terminology, types of motion, joint movements

2. Basic Chemistry:

(About three hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)
Audiovisual lecture: The basics of atoms and ions, the body as a bag of ions, body
generated electromagnetic fields and behavior, recording the body’s electricity
Marieb book Chapter 2: Basic chemistry, matter and energy, composition of matter,
molecules and compounds, chemic bonds and reactions, biochemistry – inorganic
vs. organic
Thibodeau/Patton 3rd Edition Appendix A – Chemistry of life / 4th Edition Chapter 2

3. Cells and Tissues:

(About three hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)
Audiovisual lecture: Evolution of communication systems, communication within and
between cells and tissues, development of stress response systems, wound
healing and stress
Marieb book Chapter 3: Cellular anatomy and physiology, epithelial, connective, nerve,
and, muscle tissues, introduction to tissue repair / wound healing
Thibodeau/Patton book 3rd Ed. Chapter 2/ 4th Ed. Ch 3: Tissues and membranes

4. The Nervous System:

(About four hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)
Audiovisual lecture: The overlapping types of communication systems in relationship to
evolution, how the interaction between the chemical and nervous communication
systems effects behavior, effects of stress on the nervous system, nervous system
plasticity and change with behavioral and chemical interventions, changing the
body through change in behavior and vice versa, biofeedback, pain, recording the   EEG, & addiction
Marieb book Chapter 7: Organization of the nervous system, structure and function, the
CNS, brain dysfunctions, the spinal cord, the peripheral nervous system
Thibodeau/Patton 3rd Ed. Chapter 8 / 4th Ed Ch 9: Nervous system and its diseases
Read both biofeedback chapters which are on the course web site.
Optional Lippert book Chapter 5:  The nervous system and movement: CNS, PNS

5. The Senses:

(About three hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)
Audiovisual lecture:  Sensory abilities limit perception and training, the senses not
usually taught including pheromones, ESP, etc.,
Marieb book Chapter 8: vision, hearing, balance, taste, smell
MS Word Text files entitled “A&P p100” and “A&P Blind spot”.
Thibodeau/Patton 3rd Ed. Chapter 9 / 4th Ed Ch 10: The senses and their disorders

6. The Glands – Exocrine and Endocrine systems:

(About three hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)
Audiovisual lecture:  Chemical communication vs. behavioral therapy, pheromones and
community and sexual behavior, exocrine glands
Marieb book Chapter 9: Functions, endocrine organs, hormone producing tissues
Thibodeau/Patton 3rd Ed Chapter 10/ 4th Ed Ch 11: Glandular disorders

7. The Skin – External and Internal:

(About two hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)
Audiovisual lecture: Oxygen and wound healing in relation to stress, effects of behavioral
choices on skin function and diseases, skin cancer and the need for behavioral
stimulation, behavioral interventions to speed skin / wound healing
Marieb book Chapter 4: More on membranes, basic structure and functions of the skin,
skin color, homeostatic imbalances of the skin (allergies, burns, cancer,
infections, etc.)
Thibodeau/Patton 3rd Ed Chapter 5 / 4th Ed Ch 6: Disorders of the integument

8. The Skeletal System:

(About three hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)
Audiovisual lecture: The need for bones to continuously reshape themselves in response
to behavioral challenges, stress and bone healing and change, behavioral
interventions to speed bone healing
Marieb book Chapter 5:  Functions of bones, the axial skeleton, the appendicular
skeleton, joints, developmental aspects of the skeleton
Thibodeau/Patton 3rd Ed Chapter 6 / 4th Ed Ch 7: Skeletal disorders and fractures
Optional Lippert book Chapter 2: Skeletal system: functions, types, composition of bone,
structure; Chapter 3: Joints / Articular system: types of joints, joint structure,
planes; Chapter 6: Basic biomechanics

9. The Muscular System:

(About four hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)
Audiovisual lecture: Stress and muscle tension, muscle tension vs. pain, types of muscle
tissue vs. training for different types of tasks – why you can’t train some muscles
to perform some functions, muscle rehabilitation vs. type of training
Marieb book Chapter 6: Types of  muscle tissue, muscle activity, motion, anatomy
Thibodeau/Patton 3rd Ed Ch 7 / 4th Ed Ch 8: Disorders of the musculoskeletal system
Optional Lippert book Chapters 7 & 8: The shoulder girdle and joint
Lippert book Chapter 16: The Hip: Joint structure, motions, and
muscle actions
Lippert book Chapter 12: TM / Jaw joint function
Lippert book Chapter 17:  The Knee: Muscles of the knee, muscle actions, motions
Lippert book Chapter 13:  The Neck and Trunk: Vertebral curves,
explanation of terms, joints and ligaments, muscles of the neck and trunk
Lippert book Chapter 20:  Walking: Normal gait, stance,
analysis of the swing and stance phases, determinants of gait properties
Lippert book Chapter 19: Posture

10. The Cardiovascular / Circulatory System:

(About three hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)
Audiovisual lecture:  Effects of stress and anxiety on cardiovascular functioning and vice
versa, behavioral interventions for cardiovascular problems
Marieb book Chapters 10 and 11: Composition of blood, hemostasis (clotting, etc.),
blood types, the heart, blood vessels, the lymphatic system
Thibodeau/Patton 3rd Ed Chapters 11, 12, and 13 / 4th Ed Chs 12, 13, & 14: Disorders of the cardiovascular system

11. The Immune System:

(About three hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)
Audiovisual lecture: Effects of stress on the immune system, behavioral interventions for
immune system dysfunctions
Marieb book Chapter 12: The lymphatic system, nonspecific body defenses, the immune
system
Thibodeau/Patton 3rd Ed Chapter 14 / 4th Ed Ch 15: Disorders of the immune system

12. The Respiratory System:

(About three hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)
Audiovisual lecture: Poor respiration patterns cause anxiety, psychophysiological
assessments and behavioral interventions for respiratory disorders
Marieb book Chapter 13: Anatomy, respiratory physiology
Thibodeau/Patton 3rd Ed Chapter 15 / 4th Ed Ch 16: Disorders of the respiratory system
Optional Lippert book Chapter 14:  Respiration in relationship to motion,
muscles used during respiration and their tension patterns

13. The Digestive System, Metabolism, and Nutrition:

(About two hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)
Audiovisual lecture: The gut brain, stress and metabolism, stress and GI functions,
behavioral interventions for irritable bowel disease, etc., diet vs. weight
Marieb book Chapter 14: Anatomy and functions of the digestive system, nutrition and
metabolism, body energy balance
Thibodeau/Patton 3rd Ed Chapters 16 & 17 / 4th Ed Chapters 17 & 18: Disorders of the
GI system

14. The Urinary System, Waste Disposal, Fluid Balance Systems:

(About four hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)
Audiovisual lecture: Mechanisms of continence, psychophysiological assessment
and treatment of urinary and fecal incontinence, reflexes
Marieb book Chapter 15: The kidneys, bladder, and urethra
Thibodeau/Patton 3rd Ed Chapters 18, 19 & 20 / 4th Ed 19, 20 & 21: Electrolyte balance,   Disorders of the urinary system

15. The Reproductive System, Growth, and Genetics:

(About three hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)
Audiovisual lecture: Mechanisms of orgasm, stress and sexual function, genetics,   and behavioral genetics
Marieb book Chapter 16: Anatomy and physiology of the male and female reproductive
systems, female reproductive functions
Thibodeau/Patton 3rd Ed Chapters 21, 22, & 23 / 4th Ed Chapters 22, 23, & 24: Disorders of the   reproductive system and genetics

16. (Optional) Common Pathological Conditions, Medical Terminology, Common Abbreviations and Symbols, Clinical Laboratory Values, & Examples of Pathological Conditions.

Thibodeau/Patton Appendices (There are no review questions about these sections.).

17. You aren’t quite done yet.

Fill out (1) the Foundation’s course evaluation form and (2) the BCIA evaluation form (MS Word file named “A&P BCIA evaluation form”) and send it to BCIA (info@bcia.org)

When all requirements have been successfully completed, your course completion certificate will be e-mailed to you and BCIA will be informed that you completed the course.

Oval: Click to return to course list

 

 

3. EEG Biofeedback: Assessment and Intervention

(BCIA EEG 36-hour Didactic Course)

36 CEs

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Course Concept and Description: This introductory level course is the equivalent of a three-credit course and provides 36 hours of CE credit. The course is targeted to licensed / certified clinicians such as psychologists, counselors, physical therapists, social workers, nurses, and physicians as well as to graduate students. Students learn by watching the .PPTs on the course website, reading the assignments both from materials provided on the course web site and standard texts, and interacting with their instructor via email. They answer short essay questions after each lecture rather than taking exams. Students start the course whenever they wish to and proceed at their convenience. There is a one-year limit to how long students can take to complete the course.

The course provides sufficient material so clinicians will (a) know the psychophysiological bases for performing EEG recordings (b) what the common assessments and interventions are as well as how they work, (c) what the common associated interventions are, (d) how the recording devices work in a clinical setting, (d) how to perform an effective recording, and (e) how to perform effective psychoneurophysiological assessments and interventions.  The course meets all of the requirements for the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance’s (formally Biofeedback Certification Institute of America) (BCIA) biofeedback certification course and is approved by them for this purpose. Please note that clinicians interested in being certified in biofeedback by the BCIA would have to meet the additional mentored experience and education requirements. Please see www.BCIA.org for specific requirements.

Learning objectives: The course objective is to provide the depth of knowledge in psychophysiology, EEG biofeedback equipment, and neurofeedback training techniques which clinicians are required to perform EEG-based assessments and neurofeedback based interventions. This information is crucial to effectively adding these techniques to a clinician’s practice.

This course is designed to help you (the student):

  1. Summarize the psychophysiological processes underlying each condition covered in the course;
  2. Use neuropsychophysiological recording and neurofeedback devices to record and    display psychophysiological information;
  3. Control the biofeedback display to optimize learning;
  4. Use neuropsychophysiological recording equipment to assess patients with specific conditions, and;
  5. Use neurofeedback equipment to apply specific interventions tailored to each condition covered in the course.

Topics we will cover (following the BCIA Blueprint):

  1. Introduction to and history of EEG biofeedback (concepts, learning theory, brief overview of techniques, etc.)
  2. Basic neuroanatomy and physiology
  3. Instrumentation and electronics
  4. Research and evidence-based neurofeedback
  5. Psychopharmacology (effects of substances on the EEG and clinical considerations)
  6. Treatment: Intake and other assessments
  7. Treatment: Protocol selection
  8. Treatment: Therapeutic issues (treatment techniques and considerations, practical applications, etc.)
  9. Current trends and combining with peripheral modalities
  10. Professional conduct (ethics, professional responsibility for competence, record keeping, laws, etc.)

Format: Home study supported by email discussions after each unit is completed. The lecture portion of the course is presented through a series of power-point presentations. You will hear the instructor’s voice while viewing the power point sides. The 15 lectures are between 1½ and 2½ hours in length. Reading assignments parallel the lectures. After watching the lecture and reading the assigned supporting files, you will answer a brief series of short essay review questions (6-Review Questions.docx file on the course web site). The answered questions are then emailed to the instructor. You and the instructor will discuss each unit via email after your answers are assessed. There is no need to complete the discussion with the instructor before proceeding to the succeeding lecture & chapters. It is expected that all review questions be answered correctly and completely by the student. Any questions answered incorrectly or incompletely must be discussed and/or corrected. All reading and listening assignments are in the review questions file.

Prerequisites & professional training requirements: You should have had undergraduate courses in general biology and general psychology prior to taking this course. If you haven’t had them, contact us before registering. You will do much better in the course if you have already taken our “Introduction to Psychophysiology” and “Anatomy and Physiology for Behavioral Clinicians” courses. This course is intended for licensed/certified clinicians. None of the instructional material offered will provide you with the clinical skills needed to apply the psychoneurophysiological assessment and interventional techniques you will learn in the clinical environment, unless you are already a trained clinician or educator and have had sufficient clinical supervision.

Faculty: Cynthia Kerson, PhD, QEEGD, BCN, BCB is the Director Education for Brain Science International, Clinical Director of Marin Biofeedback in San Rafael, California, the Executive Director of the ISNR Research Foundation and the secretary of the QEEG Certification Board. She is BCIA certified in biofeedback and neurofeedback and holds certification as a diplomate in QEEG and mentors for both. Cynthia is also on the Board of Directors for the Behavioral Medicine Foundation and the Biofeedback Society of California.

In her role as the Executive Director for the ISNR Research Foundation, she facilitates funding and research in the field of neurotherapy. Her role with Brain Science International is to develop introductory, intermediate and advanced courses in the specialized areas of brain training and EEG analysis. In her clinic, she specializes in biofeedback training for hypertension, addiction disorders, pain management and anxiety.

Cynthia is the EEG expert for the television program MythBusters having appeared or consulted for 6 of their episodes. Cynthia is a mentor for the BCIA and is a current member of the International Society for Neurofeedback and Research (ISNR), Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB) and the Society for the Advancement of Brain Analysis (SABA). She served as the Executive Director of the Biofeedback Society of California 2004-2008 and ISNR 2006-2011.

READING:

The cost of the below texts are not included in the course fee. Most texts for this course can be purchased at: www.bmedpress.com

 

Required Text:

Recommended Texts:

  • Getting Started with Neurofeedback by John N Demos. Good primer.
  • Biofeedback: A Practitioner’s Guide. Edited by Mark Schwartz and Frank Andrasik. Guilford Press of New York, 2003.  Discounted purchase available through AAPB’s bookstore (800 477-8892).  www.aapb.org
  • The Neurofeedback Bookby Michael and Lynda Thompson. 2003. This book is recommended for anyone planning to take the BCIA EEG exam. This book is more complex, and will be best to read after having some basic knowledge.
  • The Art of Artifactingby Corydon Hammond and Jay Gunkelman. 2001. Available at www.bmedpress.com> or amazon.com. This book is recommended for anyone wanting to record and/or edit QEEGs. The proceeds from this book support the ISNR Research Foundation (www.isnr-researchfoundation.org).

A list of other recommended reading is provided in the course entitled EEG Core Reading. This is BCIA’s recommended reading list for their exam. Note that some of the items on their reading list are also required or recommended for this course.

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4. Neuropsychophysiology: Nervous System Functions in Psychophysiology

45 hours of CE credit, Course Fee $750.

Prerequisites: An undergraduate course in general biology. It is easier if you have had an introductory neurofeedback course as well.

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Concept and Format: For purposes of this course, we consider neuropsychophysiology as the study of human behavior in its broadest terms. It incorporates the principles of neuroscience (neuro- and electro-physiology, neuroanatomy and cell and molecular biology) and neuropsychology (clinical neuropsychology, neuropsychiatry, experimental and cognitive psychology). Recent advances in neuroimaging and psychopharmacology have added new and exciting dimensions to modern neuropsychophysiogy which previously once was regarded as mainly diagnostic in nature. Therefore, the main objective of this course will be to examine the scientific basis of these research areas as they relate to the fundamentals of human behavior. Recently published research papers are introduced  into the course in order to extend the student’s views beyond the textual material. In addition, students are given the opportunity to present their research and/or clinical interests.The student will also achieve an understanding of the principles underlying the practice of EEG-biofeedback (EEG-BF) by studying the basic mechanisms of cerebral rhythmic activities, regional cerebral functions and their connectivities; and, the neuronal substrate responsible for self-regulation. Classes consist of instructor-lead discussions of the assigned reading material for the week. Currently, they are held on Satudays and last for 90 minutes to 2 hrs. depending on the complexity of the material and the depth of the questions. Holding class on the weekend allows course students to maintain their full-time practices or jobs. Help is available during the week via phone or email to the instructor at: gpkoz@thinkneuro.com. Student participation during the discussions is highly encouraged and leads to a greater understanding of the assigned reading material.

Objectives:

To provide clients with a basic understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the CNS and PNS relevant to their professional duties.

To describe the dynamic nature of  neuronal systems: e.g. sensory, motor, auditory, visual, etc.

To explain the basis  of the symptoms that result from  trauma and disease.

To present and describe some of the most recent advances in the neurosciences and future directions in research.

DISCLAIMER: Completion of this continuing education course is strictly for educational / informational purposes and does not imply competency, proficiency, and/or experience. The course completion certificate is not a clinical certification nor a license to practice.

Required Texts:

1.) Kolb, B and IO Whishaw. Fundamentals of Human Neuropsychology. 6th ed., Worth Pub, NY, 2003. There is accompaying website with multiple choice questions for assessing your understanding of the course material.

2,)  Purves, D and 6 co-editors. Neuroscience. 4th ed., Sinauer Associates, Inc, Sunderland MA, 2008. This text is used by several human medical schools and contains an atlas of the human central nervous system. Included with purchase of the book, there is an  accompanying Sinauer website that has chapter summaries, animations, online quizzes and flashcards; as well as Sylvius 4, an interactive atlas and visual glossary.

Accessing course materials: All course materials are available on the course web site. When you purchase the course, you will be given instructions for accessing the course web site immediately.

Computer and Computer Knowledge Requirements:  Anybody with a modern computer and a bit of basic understanding of computer operation (at the level of being able to send e-mails) can play this course with minimal problems. You must have a computer (a) capable of connecting to the internet and running a typical internet program, (b) containing/running a modern word processor such as Microsoft word or Word Perfect, (c) the capability to play sounds such as music (has speakers and appropriate software which normally come with any modern computer), and (d) a slide viewing program such as Power Point (you can probably get a slide viewing program free off the internet if you don’t have one). Any modern (e.g., built within the last ten years), IBM style computer running Windows 98 and more recent platforms (e.g., XP or Windows 8) should be able to do this. Speed, hard disk size, and RAM are not factors for computers in the above category.

Dozens of students have used recent Apple products (MACs etc.) for the course however they frequently have more difficulty playing the course materials than PC users do.

If you are using a MAC type of computer, you must have a current version of “quicktime”. If you do not have it, you can download it for free from the web.

Methods of Evaluation and Grading

To pass this course, you must complete the following:

Complete the review questions for each chapter in Purves & Kolb/Whishaw (which are posted by the publishers on their websites) and e-mail them to me. I will review your answers and respond so we can discuss and then you can correct any problems. All answers must be corrected or discussed.

Present a one hour “Power Point” based discussion of any topic within the course which you and I agree upon.

Participate in the web based class discussions.

Faculty: The course is taught by Gerald Kozlowski, PhD.  Dr. Kozlowski received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1970. His work history includes Physiology; Teaching Fellow, University of Rochester (1971 – 1973); Assistant and Associate Professor of Anatomy & Physiology, Colorado State University (1973 – 1976); Associate Professor of Anatomy & Physiology & Biophysics, Colorado State University (1976 – 1978); Associate Professor of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Texas, Health Science Center at Houston (1978 – 1980); Associate Professor of Physiology, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas (1980 – 1998); Full Faculty Member, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical School (1980 – 1998); Senior Lecturer of Department of Cognition and Neurosciences, University of Texas at Dallas (1998 – current). Dr. Kozlowski publishes widely in applied psychophysiology.

Topic Outline:

Part I, Background: Chap 1 (The Development of Neuropsychology) and Chap 2 (Origins of the Human Brain and Behavior)

Chap 3 (Organization of the Nervous System) and Chap 4 (The Structure and Electrical Activity of Neurons)

Chap 5 ( Communication Between Neurons), Chap 6 (The Influence of Drugs on Behavior) and Chap 7 (Imaging the Brain’s Activity)

Part II, Cortical Organization: Chap 8 (Orgainzation of the Sensory Systems) and Chap 9 Organization of the Motor Sytem).

Chap 10 (Principles of Neocortical Function), Chap 11 (Cerebral Asymmetry) and Chap 12 (Variations in Cerebral Asymmetry)

Part III, Cortical Functions: Chap 13 (The Occipital Lobes), Chap 14 (The Parietal Lobes) and Chap 15 (The Temporal Lobes)

Chap 16 (The Frontal Lobes) and Chap 17 (Disconnection Sydromes)

Part IV, Higher Functions: Chap 18 (Memory), Chap 19 (The Origins of Language) and Chap 20 (Emotion)

Chap 21 (Spatial Behavior) and Chap 22 (Attention, Mental Images and Consciousness)

Part V, Plasticity and Disorders: Chap 23 (Brain Development and Plasticity), Chap 24 (Developmental Disorders) and Chap 25 (Plasticity, Recovery, and Rehabilitation of the Adult Brain)

Chap 26 (Neurological Disorders) and Chap 27 (Psychiatric and Related Disorders)

Chap 28 (Neuropsychological Assessment)

When all requirements have been successfully completed, your course completion certificate will be e-mailed to you and BCIA will be informed that you completed the course.

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5. Heart Rate Variability Recording and Feedback

30 CEs $500

Welcome to your CE course on HRV Recording and Feedback.

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!This course meets the requirements for BCIA’s certificate in heart rate variability (HRV). It emphasizes methods for evaluation and modification of autonomic quieting through heart rate variability training. Topics covered include (1) Cardiac anatomy and physiology, (2) Respiratory anatomy and physiology, (3) Autonomic nervous system anatomy and physiology, and (4) Heart rate variability psychophysiology, instrumentation, measurement, biofeedback strategies and applications.

You will learn by watching audiovisual lectures provided on the course web, reading assignments both from materials provided on the course web site, watching a movie, and interacting extensively with the instructor via e-mail and, if you wish, by phone. You will answer short essay questions rather than taking exams.

Specific Course Objectives: As a result of taking this course, you should be able to:

6. Have knowledge of each topic (listed below) required to earn the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance’s (BCIA’s) certificate in Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback.

7.  Understand how basic cardiac anatomy and physiology (A&P) relate to HRV.

8. Be able to determine your own resonance frequency and calculate it for others.

9. Have sufficient knowledge of respiratory A&P to relate it to HEV.

10.  Understand how the autonomic nervous system’s A&P cause changes in organ system functioning.

11.  Be able to use standard biofeedback instruments to measure, assess, and feedback HRV.

12.  Be able to train people to change their HRV through biofeedback.

Ethics Training: NOTE: You must take a three or more CE course on “ethics in biofeedback” for BCIA’s HRV certificate. The Foundation gives an excellent 5 CE course on this topic which goes very well with your HRV course. You can purchase it at www.biofeedbacktraining.org or by emailing rsherman@nwinet.com.

This course meets or exceeds the number of hours required for BCIA’s HRV certificate.

 
BCIA HRV Biofeedback BLUEPRINT AREAS
 
# HRS REQUIRED by BCIA
 
Minimum # HRS taught In this course
I. Cardiac Anatomy/Physiology 1 2
II. Respiratory Anatomy/Physiology 1 2
III. ANS Anatomy & Physiology .5 1.5
IV. Heart Rate Variability 2 2
V HRV Instrumentation 3 3
VI. HRV Measurements 2 3
VII. HRV Biofeedback Strategies 4 4
VIII HRV Biofeedback Applications 1.5 2
TOTAL 15 19.5

Faculty: PAUL. M. LEHRER, PH.D.

Dr. Lehrer is a graduate of both Columbia College and Harvard University. He is currently Professor of Psychiatry at Rutgers ‑ Robert Wood Johnson Medical School where he performs much of the research which supports this field. He is a licensed psychologist in New Jersey and is certified by BCIA in general biofeedback. Dr Lehrer has won over 27 grants from numerous organizations – many of which support the material in this course – and has published over 136 articles in refereed journals along with numerous chapters and three books. He has chaired many committees within both the APA and AAPB as well as having been president of AAPB.

REQUIRED EQUIPMENT: Just a reminder that you need to have your equipment available and working before you begin the course.

Remember that to take this course you must have access to a biofeedback system capable of providing heart rate variability biofeedback, including a computer display of HRV, preferably with a spectral analysis.  It would be preferable (but not required) that the system also can measure respiration and HR simultaneously.  Acceptable systems include those manufactured by HeartMath, J&J Engineering, Thought Technology, Nexus, and Biocomp. If you have a different system, contact the instructor prior to purchasing the course.

Methods of Evaluation:

1. You must answer each of the questions which are in the course instructions document. You must answer each question correctly. You must submit the answers to the questions for each section prior to continuing to the next section. Email your answers to Dr Lehrer.

(To get credit for this course, you must answer the course questions which are embedded in the reading assignments for each unit below.)

  1. You must participate in and successfully complete the real time interaction with the instructor.


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6. Stimulation Technologies

24 CEs

Level: Introductory to Intermediate (some knowledge of brain function and anatomy as well as neuromodulatory mechanisms is required)

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Abstract: Stimulation technologies, which include audio-visual entrainment (AVE), cranio-electro stimulation (CES) and transcranial DC stimulation (tDCS) are current treatment modalities that utilize both indirect and direct stimulation of the brain to regulate brain state, cognitive and emotional wellbeing. These are forms of applied psychophysiology – a union of psychology and physiology. There are many research publications showing efficacy with AD/HD, seizure disorders, substance abuse, autistic spectrum disorders, mild traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, cognitive decline in seniors and academic improvements in college students, among others. A medical and/or psychological practitioner may, under the scope of his license, practice this intervention. It is essential that the practitioner gains full knowledge of the neuroanatomical and neurophysiological features of the brain sites being trained and understands the likely objective and subjective reactions.  A medical professional and a psychologist would be brought to current knowledge about psychological and clinical implications of the various technologies.

This course addresses the concepts of dysarousal, learning principles, best training protocols, and treatment plans for specific presentations for neurofeedback and neuromodulatory approaches. This course will also demonstrate EEG recording and training procedures with state of the art instrumentation and will prepare the clinician for providing neurofeedback in his practice.

References:

Collura, T. & Siever, D (2009). Chapter 8 – Audio-visual entrainment in relation to mental health and EEG. Quantitative EEG and Neurofeedback-2nd Edition, 195-220.

Kharrazian, D. (2013). Why my brain isn’t working. Elephant Press: Carlsbad, CA.

Siever, D. (2003). Audio-visual entrainment: I. History and physiological mechanisms. Biofeedback. 31, (2), 21-27.

Siever, D. (2009). Transcranial DC stimulation. NeuroConnections. January, 2009, 22-25.

Smith, R (2007). Cranial electrotherapy stimulation: Its First Fifty Years, Plus Three. Tate Publishing: Mustang, Oklahoma.

Educational need:

Improved understanding of the psychological and physiological implications of the factors, which influence brain function. An understanding of brain stimulation and the technologies of AVE, CES and tDCS plus an understanding of the treatment protocols used with these technologies and an understanding of the outcomes produced.

8 Objectives:

  1. The attendee will gain a foundational knowledge of arousal, how it works and the myriad of influences that modulate it, particularly those influences which modulate it to our detriment.
  2. The attendee will gain a foundational knowledge of QEEGs and view pre and post results of a few cases using AVE.
  3. The attendee will gain a foundational knowledge of heart rate variability (HRV) and the way in which AVE enhances breath and heart.
  4. The attendee will gain a foundational knowledge of the underlying physiological mechanisms on which AVE, CES and tDCS act in bringing about their effectiveness in treatment.
  5. The attendee will gain a foundational knowledge of the history, development and relevant research relating to the emergence of AVE, CES and tDCS and the studies that have been completed in proving their efficacy.
  6. The attendee will learn how AVE protocols are designed.
  7. View demonstrations of the various technologies and how they are employed in order to facilitate an understanding of the equipment, electronic and instrumentation concepts so they may use the equipment with confidence.
  8. The attendee will be better prepared for handling clinical situations where simple, quick, effective and low cost methods may be employed in remediating cognitive and emotional challenges.

Course Outline:

1. Dysarousal Part I (3.5 hours)

View webinar “When Arousal Goes Awry” (2.5 hours)

Read all materials in your Documents 1 folder

Respond to review questions of this section and send to ckerson@saybrook.edu

This section focuses on the general structure of the emotional brain, neuronal regulation and how, genetics, diet, pre-natal/childhood factors, environmental stressors cause dysregulation of the brain, its neurotransmitters, cerebral blood flow and behavior.

2. Dysarousal Part II QEEG (1.5 hours)

View .PPT “QEEG and Pre-Post Studies” (1.5 hours)

(There is no reading for this section)

Respond to review questions of this section and send to ckerson@saybrook.edu

This section is a condensed introduction into EEG and QEEG in particular. The intent of this webinar is to familiarize the student with enough basic knowledge of EEG and QEEG to understand the pre and post results following treatment with AVE.

3. Introduction to Audio-visual entrainment and History (1 Hour)

View .PPT “Introduction to AVE” (30 minutes)

Read all materials in your Documents 3 folder

Respond to review questions of this section and send to ckerson@saybrook.edu

This section introduces the student as to the evolution and historical milestones of audio-visual entrainment technology. It also covers how AVE can use as a prophylactic against maladies and how AVE enhances life in general.

4. Physiology of Audio-visual entrainment Technology (2 hours)

View .PPT “Physiology of AVE” (30 minutes)

Read all materials in your Documents 4 Folder

Respond to review questions of this section and send to ckerson@saybrook.edu

This section involves being able to understand the effects that AVE has of brain physiology and its relevant effects on states of mind.

5. Clinical Studies of Audio-visual Entrainment  (4 hours)

View webinar “Studies of AVE” (1 hour)

Read all materials in your Documents 5 folder

Respond to review questions of this section and send to ckerson@saybrook.edu

The section focuses on the effects of various AVE protocols and the effects they had on improving attention, IQ and behavior.

6. ADD/ADHD and Academic Performance Studies of AVE  (2 hours)

View .PPT “Learning and Attention” (45 minutes)

Read all materials in your Documents 6 folder

Respond to review questions of this section and send to ckerson@saybrook.edu

This section focuses on learning issues, AVE protocols and the effects that they have on improving attention, IQ, grade-point average and behavior.

7. Application of Stimulation Technologies in Sports (1.5 hours)

View .PPT “1 Basics” (30 minutes)

Read all materials in your Documents 7 Folder

Respond to review questions of this section and send to ckerson@saybrook.edu

This section involves understanding the elements involved in peak performance and the “zone,” and how AVE is used to enhance sports performance.

8. Matters of the Heart (2 hours)

View webinar “Matters of the Heart” (30 minutes)

Listen to .MP3 “Breath Training Tutorial” (15 minutes).

Listen to the .MP3 “HRV with Entrainment” track.

Read all materials in your Documents 8 folder

Respond to review questions of this section and send to ckerson@saybrook.edu

The heart is very sensitive to changes in thoughts and emotion. Heart rate variability is a biofeedback based method of measuring heart-breath rhythms and using them to teach relaxation and meditation. However, if a subject is too over-aroused, HRV can be counterproductive as the client tries to establish a slowed (meditative) breath rhythm when his/her autonomic activation clearly will not allow it. AVE breaks through high arousal , mainly by clearing out racy, destructive thoughts, thus allow the subject to gain breath control and fast-track to a calm state of body and mind.

9. AVE Protocol Design  (1 hour)

View .PPT “AVE Protocol Design” (1 hour)

View .MPEG “Applying AVE” (15 minutes).

Read all materials in your Documents 9 folder

Respond to review questions of this section and send to ckerson@saybrook.edu

You will learn the actions on which tDCS is based. You will learn several electrode placement montages for treating various maladies and enhancing cognitive functioning. It also addresses safety and potential side-effects from AVE.

10.  Cranio-Electro Stimulation and Micro-current Electrotherapy (2.5 hours)

View webinar “CES” (30 minutes)

View .MPEG “Applying CES and MET” (15 minutes).

Read all materials in your Documents 10 folder

Respond to review questions of this section and send to ckerson@saybrook.edu

This section of the course focuses on the effects of CES, its applications and how to use CES on the body (micro-current electro therapy) for treating pain. This section also addresses safety and potential side-effects from CES.

11.  Transcranial DC Stimulation  (3 hours)

View .PPT “tDCS” (1 hour)

View .MPEG “Applying tDCS” (15 minutes)

Read all materials in your Documents 11 folder

Respond to review questions of this section and send to ckerson@saybrook.edu

The student will learn the actions on which tDCS is based. You will learn several electrode placement montages for treating various maladies and enhancing cognitive functioning. This section also addresses safety and potential side-effects of tDCS.

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7. Quantitative Electroencephalogram

as an Assessment Tool for Brain-based Disorders

Credits  – 24 CE Hours $500

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!

Concept and Description: Quantitative electroencephalogram (QEEG) has become an important technique for psychophysiological assessment of brain-based disorders. This course covers reading and de-artifacting the EEG record, montages, database comparisons, drug effects on the EEG, frequency analysis, spectral and topographic aspects and basic neuroanatomy and physiology, based upon Brodmann areas and anatomical structures.

Format: Home study supported by email chats after each unit is completed. The course materials are accessed from the course web site. The lecture portion of the course is presented through a series of audiovisual lectures profusely illustrated by power-point slides. You will hear the instructor’s voice while viewing the power point sides. Reading assignments parallel the lectures. After watching the lecture and reading the assigned supporting files, you will answer a brief series of short essay or multiple-choice review questions. The answered questions are then emailed to the instructor. You and the instructor will discuss each unit via email chat after your answers are assessed. There is no need to complete the discussion with the instructor before proceeding to the succeeding lecture & chapters.

Computer and Computer Knowledge Requirements:  Knowledge of use of internet-based applications, MS Word and emailing is essential.

Prerequisites: None. This course meets the accreditation requirements for the didactic for certification from the QEEGCB.

Course Outline:

Editing raw EEG and artifacts (2 hours)

View .PPT “1 Basics” (45 minutes)

Read all materials in your Documents 1 Folder

Respond to review questions of this section and send to ckerson@saybrook.edu

This section involves being able to read a raw EEG record and discern artifacts, transients and other EEG and non-EEG events, including physiologic, extra-physiologic and movements in the environment. The student will also review basic electronics necessary to understand how the EEG signal is obtained.

Drug Effects on the EEG (2 hours)

View webinar “Medication Effects on the EEG” (2 hours)

Read all materials in Documents 2 folder

Respond to review questions of this section and send to ckerson@saybrook.edu

The webinar focuses on the effects of various drugs on the EEG/QEEG data and the reading shows physiologic effects based on research and other resources.

Database Analysis (4.5 hours)

View .PPT “Databases for EEG” (1 hour)

Read all materials in your Documents 3 folder

Respond to review questions of this section and send to ckerson@saybrook.edu

You will know the best subject inclusion and exclusion criteria for building a database, understand fundamental statistical consideration within databases and have knowledge about t-tests, alpha and P levels, correlational relationships and z-score measures once complete with this section.

Clinical and Cognitive Aspects (6.5 hours)

View .PPT “Clinical” (2 hours)

Read all materials in Documents 4 folder

Respond to review questions of this section and send to ckerson@saybrook.edu

The student will understand developmental changes in the EEG, the origins of the EEG, what EEG signatures should be referred out to other professionals, LORETA interpretation and training, how clinical presentation may affect the EEG and be knowledgeable about Brodmann area functions and network connections and general cognitive and clinical changes that take effect after neurofeedback training based upon publications.

Montages and Spectral and Topographic Aspects of the EEG (4 hours)

View .PPT “Montages” (3 hours)

Read all materials in Documents 5 folder

Respond to review questions of this section and send to ckerson@saybrook.edu

Once this section is completed, the student will have a working knowledge of the montages, transforms and power displays along with the specific perspectives they can provide a reader of QEEG output, an understanding of what defines the various montages and the circumstances of their use as well as an understanding of sources in the brain from which various frequency bands normally emanate and phase and coherence, how they relate and what they can mean in the interpretation of the QEEG.

Practical Observation (6 hours)

The student is required observe QEEG acquisitions with a local practitioner. The practitioner must contact your instructor to establish his/her qualifications. This can be done at any point during the course and must constitute 4 hours of time. The student will then write a report summarizing the experience, including practical issues such as artifact avoidance, including drowsiness, difficult clients, specific tasks observed and experience getting low impedances, among other things. This can be done remotely (connect through an online meeting application such as GoToMeeting, WebEx or TeamViewer) if there are no local practitioners who do QEEG.

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8. Optimal functioning: Psychophysiological Applications For Enhancing Performance In Sports, Education, Business, and other Performance Settings

45 CE Hours $750

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!

Effectively performing under pressure in competition, on stage, in school or in various impromptu work settings is unquestionably difficulty for most individuals.  Similarly, working within schools or large organizations to increase work efficiency, decrease accidents, and increase morale while decreasing stress related absences, disorders, and conflicts is a complex task being requested by more and more employers as the impact of job stress becomes more apparent. Optimal performance in these environments is difficult but achievable with appropriate training. The research supporting the efficacy of such efforts is reviewed and the typical techniques for interventions with diverse groups are illustrated.

A wide variety of behavioral interventions have been effective in enhancing and optimizing performance in challenging settings. Effects include increased endurance and accuracy under many circumstances especially within sports and the military. Specific interventions shown to be effective in these circumstances are grounded in sport psychophysiology. Effective presentation of applied psychophysiology and behavioral medicine concepts to diverse groups requires considerable training and experience. Practice with the necessary skills can be augmented by communicating with peers, health care professionals and administrators. Effective methods for presenting to each type of group may be uniquely different but there are several underlying principles that apply to all diverse populations. Typical presentation methods for workshops, lectures, and public appearances are identified which are known to optimize understanding of behavioral medicine techniques.

Learning Objectives: Students will develop a better understanding of psychophysiology, sport psychology, and biofeedback, as these disciplines relate to optimal performance.  Students will learn about applications of these concepts across different performance settings.

Required Text: Case Studies in Applied Psychophysiology: Neurofeedback and Biofeedback Treatments for Advances in Human Performance [Hardcover] by W. Alex Edmonds (Editor), Gershon Tenenbaum (Editor)Hardcover: 342 pages, Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (December 12, 2011), ISBN-10: 0470971738, ISBN-13: 978-0470971734

Optional Recommended Text:  Biofeedback & Neurofeedback Applications in Sport Psychology Paperback –by Benjamin W. Strack (Author) , PhD (Author) , BCB (Author) , Michael K. Linden (Author) , BCN (Author) , Vietta Sue Wilson (Author). Paperback: 414 pages. Publisher: Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback ,

ISBN-10: 098429791X, ISBN-13: 978-0984297917

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9. Ethics for Biofeedback Providers

5 CEUs, Course Fee: $150

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Course Concept and Description: This 5 CE, distance based course is intended for clinicians, educators, and coaches who have incorporated or are interested in incorporating biofeedback (including neurofeedback) intervention and psychophysiological assessment techniques into their practices. It emphasizes issues in ethics and professional conduct which are of special interest to clinicians incorporating biofeedback – many of which are not clearly spelled out in typical codes of ethics and conduct promulgated by clinical organizations. Participants attend three audiovisual lectures (hear the instructor’s voice while watching slides), read text files, and interact with the instructor via e-mail. At the end of the course, participants answer a set of short essay questions covering key concepts in the course. No text is required for this course.

Most participants require about five hours to complete the course including answering the end of course questions and interacting with the instructor. Participants start the course whenever they wish to and proceed through the course at their convenience for up to one year. This course does not replace the standard 45 hour (3 credit) ethics courses usually required for licensure and does not cover all areas of ethics usually covered by such courses.

Five optional lectures are included in the course (introduction to biofeedback and for lectures on what you need to know to do biofeedback). Attending these lectures adds about an extra hour to the course.

Learning objectives: The course objective is to familiarize participants with the key ethical considerations and issues in professional conduct involved in providing biofeedback based interventions and clinical psychophysiological assessments which are frequently not covered adequately in traditional ethics courses.

This course is designed to help you (the student):

3. Apply an understanding what biofeedback and psychophysiological recording are to your interventions.

4. Recognize the training you will need to ethically and knowledgeably incorporate biofeedback based interventions and psychophysiological assessments into your practice.

5. Develop knowledge based decisions on incorporating validated and unvalidated interventions into your practice and charging for them.

6. Recognize the importance of understanding how medications (a) cause symptoms of the type commonly treated with biofeedback and (b) affect the signals.

7. Develop appropriate informed consent and treatment explanation documents.

8. Determine the extent to which you can apply sensors and when you need a chaperone.

Format: Home study supported by e-mail chats after each unit is completed. The lecture portion of the course is presented through a series of audiovisual lectures profusely illustrated by power-point slides and movies. The course is accessed from the course web site. The audiovisual lectures are on power point slides. You will hear the instructor’s voice while viewing the power point sides. The lectures are between 1 ½ and 2 ½ hours in length. Reading assignments parallel the lectures. After watching the lecture and reading the assigned supporting files, you will answer a brief series of short essay review questions (which are in the review questions file on the course web site). The answered questions are then e-mailed to the instructor. You and the instructor will discuss each unit via e-mail chat after your answers are assessed. There is no need to complete the discussion with the instructor before proceeding to the succeeding lecture & chapters. It is expected that all review questions will be answered correctly and completely by the student. Any questions answered incorrectly or incompletely must be discussed and/or corrected. You will have at least one real-time meeting with the instructor via a web based program such as “go to meeting” during which you will interact around your new skills.

Accessibility: Hearing impaired people can view the slides only as virtually all of the material presented in the lectures is typed onto the slides. Visually impaired people can concentrate on the verbal lectures as the slide material is repeated in the lecture accompanying each slide.

Accessing course materials: All course materials are available on the course web site. When you purchase the course, you will be given instructions for accessing the course web site immediately.

Computer and Computer Knowledge Requirements:  Anybody with a modern computer and a bit of basic understanding of computer operation (at the level of being able to send e-mails) can play this course with minimal problems. You must have a computer (a) capable of connecting to the internet and running a typical internet program, (b) containing/running a modern word processor such as Microsoft word or Word Perfect, (c) the capability to play sounds such as music (has speakers and appropriate software which normally come with any modern computer), and (d) a slide viewing program such as Power Point (you can probably get a slide viewing program free off the internet if you don’t have one). Any modern (e.g., built within the last ten years), IBM style computer running Windows 98 and more recent platforms (e.g., XP or Windows 8) should be able to do this. Speed, hard disk size, and RAM are not factors for computers in the above category.

Dozens of students have used recent Apple products (MACs etc.) for the course however they frequently have more difficulty playing the course materials than PC users do.

If you are using a MAC type of computer, you must have a current version of “quicktime”. If you do not have it, you can download it for free from the web.

Faculty: The course is given by Dr. Richard Sherman, Ph.D.  He is certified by BCIA, approved by BCIA to teach the general biofeedback certification course, and currently teaches A&P, Pelvic floor disorders, pain, and other courses. He is a professional psychophysiologist with extensive training (his Ph.D. is in biology & psychology), has nearly 30 years of experience in the field, and has published over 130 books, chapters, and articles (mostly in peer reviewed journals). Dr. Sherman is Director of the psychophysiology doctoral specialization at Saybrook University and has held many positions within the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback including president. Full CV available upon request and on the course web site.

The ten major topics covered in this introductory level course are:

  1. Defining biofeedback and clinical psychophysiology – knowing what biofeedback actually is and what it is not. (Includes optional “introduction to BFB” lecture.)
  2. Training required to ethically and knowledgeably provide biofeedback based services even in cases where a state license includes biofeedback as a practice modality. Includes a discussion of needing to understand how the equipment works, how the body works relative to the signals being fed back, and relationships between specific, diagnosable conditions, and the feedback signal. (Includes optional “what you need to know to do biofeedback” lecture.)
  3. Ethical considerations in charging for non-validated biofeedback based interventions. This includes a discussion of standards for accepting an intervention as efficacious, FDA labels of biofeedback devices, etc.
  4. Client / Patient Rights. This topic includes (a) informed consent for biofeedback based interventions and psychophysiological assessments, (b) patient privacy,  (c) abandonment, (d) duty to protect, & (e) record keeping.
  5. The need to understand the effects of medications on symptoms treated with biofeedback and on the biofeedback signal.
  6. Who can use biofeedback devices as part of therapy – the issue of FDA limitations on prescription of biofeedback devices, technicians running biofeedback sessions, billing issues, etc.
  7. Applying the biofeedback sensors – can you touch the patient? When do you need a chaperone?
  8. Conflicts of interest in charging for home practice aids as part of biofeedback therapy.
  9. Issues in advertising biofeedback based services.
  10. Ethical principles promulgated by the Biofeedback Certification Institute of America. The discussion includes overlap between and precedence of ethical principles promulgated by BCIA and profession based groups such as the APA.

When all requirements have been successfully completed, your course completion certificate will be e-mailed to you and BCIA will be informed that you completed the course.

Oval: Click to return to course list

10. Pain Assessment and Intervention For Behavioral Clinicians

45 Hours of CE Credit / Course Fee $750

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Course Concept and Objectives:

Students learn by watching audiovisual lectures and movies provided on the course web site, reading assignments both from materials provided on the web site, and standard texts, and interacting with their instructor via e-mail. They answer short essay questions after each lecture rather than taking exams. Previous students have found that this course takes between 45 and 95 hours of work to perform.

Pain is among the most common reasons patients approach the health care community and is, tragically, among the least successfully managed problems. The assessment and management of acute and chronic pain are fraught with ignorance, poor training, difficulties, complexities, and controversies all of which combine to produce pervasive misdiagnoses and ludicrously improper, ineffective care. Thus, patients with both acute and chronic pain frequently receive poor care from the medical community and are left to fend for themselves as best they can in the world of rumor, self-medication, and charlatans.

It is the objective of this course to provide you with the information you need to understand the underlying problems, be able to perform a reasonable assessment of patients with chronic and acute pain both on and off the ward, recognize when pain is not being appropriately or adequately ameliorated, and to be able to make or recommend interventions consistent with your clinical skills. Specifically, this course intends to:

  1. Provide you with a basic understanding of the physiology, biochemistry, and psychology underlying pain mechanisms.
  2. Provide you with sufficient knowledge about how pain mechanisms work to apply the knowledge to their evaluative and therapeutic interventions.
  3. Give detailed information about several pain syndromes (including headache, RSD, low back pain, and phantom limb pain) so you will be abreast of current knowledge and be aware that similar depths of knowledge exist for most pain syndromes and must be searched out before attempting to evaluate or treat people with the problem.
  4. Summarize the strengths and weaknesses of  evidence supporting the efficacy of self-regulatory interventions for prevention and reduction of  various pain problems.
  5. Provide extensive examples of how to perform evaluations and non-pharmacological interventions.

DISCLAIMER: Completion of this continuing education course is strictly for educational / informational purposes and does not imply competency, proficiency, and/or experience. The course completion certificate is not a clinical certification nor a license to practice. 

How we are going to proceed through the course:

This home study course is divided into 31 units. Each unit consists of a recorded audiovisual lecture, one of more chapters of reading in the texts, review questions to be answered, and a discussion with me. The lecture portion of the course is presented through a series of audiovisual lectures profusely illustrated by power-point slides as well as eleven movies. There isn’t enough lecture time to cover all of the practices – especially those related to pharmacology – so your reading will be very important. When you sign up for the course, you will be given immediate access to the course web site which contains the audiovisual lectures, movies, and background text files.

After each lecture, you will answer a brief series of essay questions about each topic covered during the lecture, e-mail your answers to me, and then speak with me by phone or exchange e-mails about each topic. This will give you an opportunity to ask questions and for me to fill in gray areas and provide additional information on topics of special interest to you.

Accessing course materials: All course materials are available on the course web site. When you purchase the course, you will be given instructions for accessing the course web site immediately.

Computer and Computer Knowledge Requirements:  Anybody with a modern computer and a bit of basic understanding of computer operation (at the level of being able to send e-mails) can play this course with minimal problems. You must have a computer (a) capable of connecting to the internet and running a typical internet program, (b) containing/running a modern word processor such as Microsoft word or Word Perfect, (c) the capability to play sounds such as music (has speakers and appropriate software which normally come with any modern computer), and (d) a slide viewing program such as Power Point (you can probably get a slide viewing program free off the internet if you don’t have one). Any modern (e.g., built within the last ten years), IBM style computer running Windows 98 and more recent platforms (e.g., XP or Windows 8) should be able to do this. Speed, hard disk size, and RAM are not factors for computers in the above category.

Dozens of students have used recent Apple products (MACs etc.) for the course however they frequently have more difficulty playing the course materials than PC users do.

If you are using a MAC type of computer, you must have a current version of “quicktime”. If you do not have it, you can download it for free from the web

Required Text: (Cost of the text is not included in the course fee)

Sherman, R: Pain Assessment and Intervention from a Psychophysiological Perspective. Published by the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB) in 2012. An electronic copy of the course is with your course materials. You can purchase the hard copy from www.aapb.org.

Very Close to Required but you can get away without them:

  1. Pain: A textbook for Therapists. Edited by Jenny Strong, Anita Unruh, Anthony Wright, G. Baxter. Published by Churchill Livingstone of NY. 2002.  ISBN 0-443-05978-0.
  2. Turk, D, Melzack R: Handbook of Pain Assessment; Second Edition. Guilford Press of NY. 2001. ISBN 1-57230-488X.
  3. Optional Reading:
    1. Wolf’s Headache and other head pain – 7th edition. Edited by Stephen Silberstein, Richard Lipton and Donald Dalessio. Oxford University Press of NY 2001.ISBN 0-19-513518-0.
    2. Mark Schwartz et al: Biofeedback: A Practitioner’s guide. Guilford Press of New York, 2003. The 4th edition is due out in Nov of 2015.

Faculty: The course is given by Dr. Richard Sherman, Ph.D.  He is certified by BCIA, approved by BCIA to teach the general biofeedback certification course, and currently teaches A&P, Pelvic floor disorders, pain, and other courses. He is a professional psychophysiologist with extensive training (his Ph.D. is in biology & psychology), has nearly 30 years of experience in the field, and has published over 130 books, chapters, and articles (mostly in peer reviewed journals). Dr. Sherman is Director of the psychophysiology doctoral specialization at Saybrook University and has held many positions within the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback including president. Full CV available upon request and on the course web site.

Lectures and their associated reading:

1. Background and basic concepts (Sherman Section A, view the “introduction to biofeedback”   lecture and read the biofeedback chapter files; optional Strong 1)

2. Determining credibility of techniques (Sherman Section H, optional Turk 31 – 34)

3. Stress – pain relationships, psychological factors (Sherman 1, 4, optional Strong 4 – 6, 22, optional Turk 1 – 10)

4. Physiological bases of pain 1: Human electricity & signal generation

5. Physiological bases of pain 2: Development and organization of the nervous system (Sherman   2, optional Strong 2 & 3 (and   4 – 6 if you haven’t read them)

6. Physiological bases of pain 3: Effect of organization of the nervous system on pain   processing including referred pain & genetics (Sherman 2)

7. Physiological bases of pain 4: Muscles (Sherman 1 – 6, 7 – 12, Strong 17)

8. Psychophysiological recording 1: Introduction (Sherman 26 – 33)

9. Psychophysiological recording 2: Instrumentation (Sherman 26 – 33)

10. Psychophysiological recording 3: Muscle tension (Sherman 8)

11. Psychophysiological recording 4: Respiration, heart rate (Sherman 26 – 33)

12. Psychophysiological recording 5: Blood flow, EEG, safety (Sherman 13 – 15, 31)

13. Headache causes (Sherman 20; optional Turk 11, 24 – 26)

14. Low back pain causes and trigger points (Sherman 7 – 12, 19, 21; optional Turk 23)

15 – 17. Pelvic pain causes 1 – 3

18. Phantom pain Causes (Sherman 22; optional Turk 27, 28; optional Strong 18)

19. Chest, abdominal, fibromyalgia causes plus complex patient assessment (Sherman 23 – 25; optional Turk 30)

20. Psychophysiologically oriented assessment and tracking techniques including profiles (Sherman 16 – 24; optional Strong 7; optional Turk 15 – 22, 29, 30)

21. Norms and habituation in psychophysiology (Sherman 32)

22. Intervention 1: Basic concepts, surgical and physical interventions (Sherman 26, 48, 49;   optional Turk 12; optional Strong 8, 10, 11, 13, 14, 20, 21)

23 & 24. Interventions 2 & 3: Alternative medicine interventions (Sherman 51, 52; optional Strong   12)

25 – 27. Interventions 4 – 6: Behavioral medicine interventions including biofeedback (Sherman 36 – 47; optional Strong 9, 14, 15)

28. Interventions 7: Pharmacological intervention (Sherman 50; optional Strong 16, 50)

29 and 30. Ethics (read the text files DPC ethics BCIA, DPC Belmont report, & DPC patient

handouts and consents)

31. Practice cases, anticipated success rates, and conclusion (Sherman section I)

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11. Behavioral Interventions for Pelvic Floor Disorders

45 Hours of CE Credit / Course Fee $750

Concept and Objectives:

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!  This course is set at the level of a typical 3 credit post-licensure, introductory level course. The course is targeted to licensed / certified clinicians such as psychologists, counselors, physical therapists, social workers, nurses, and physicians as well as to graduate students. Students learn by watching audiovisual lectures provided on the course web site, watching movies demonstrating recording techniques and interviews, reading assignments both from materials provided on the web site and standard texts, and interacting with their instructor via e-mail. They answer short essay questions after each lecture rather than taking exams. Previous students have found that this course takes between 45 and 95 hours of work to perform.

This course provides a basic understanding of pelvic floor functions and structures along with clinical etiologies of pelvic floor disorders treated by behavioral interventions. It provides sufficient information on research supporting behavioral interventions, and clinical protocols for behavioral interventions to bring health care providers to the point where they have the knowledge base needed to provide these interventions to their clients within their scopes of practice and expertise after the providers gain hands-on experience by working with experienced practitioners. You may wish to contact the Foundation for information about hands-on training.

Learning objectives: The course objective is to provide the depth of knowledge in pelvic area A&P, psychophysiology, biofeedback equipment, and training techniques which clinicians require to perform psychophysiologically oriented assessments and biofeedback and other behaviorally based interventions for pelvic floor disorders. This information is crucial to effectively adding these techniques to a clinician’s practice.

This course is designed to help you (the student):

      1. Summarize the psychophysiological processes and anatomy underlying each pelvic floor condition covered in the course.
      2. Use psychophysiological recording and biofeedback devices record and display psychophysiological information about musculoskeletal functioning of the pelvic floor.
      3. Control the biofeedback display to optimize learning to correct patterns of muscle tension in the pelvic floor.
      4. Use psychophysiological recording equipment to assess patients with pelvic floor musculoskeletal dysfunctions.
      5. Use biofeedback equipment to apply specific interventions tailored to each muscle related pelvic floor condition covered in the course.
      6. Use behavioral techniques learned in the course to assist patients in controlling muscle related dysfunction patterns causing specific pelvic floor problems.

DISCLAIMER:Completion of this continuing education course is strictly for educational / informational purposes and does not imply competency, proficiency, and/or experience. The course completion certificate is not a clinical certification nor a license to practice. 

Format: Home study supported by e-mail chats after each unit is completed. The lecture portion of the course is presented through a series of audiovisual lectures profusely illustrated by power-point slides and movies. The course is accessed from the course web site. The audiovisual lectures are on power point slides. You will hear the instructor’s voice while viewing the power point sides. The lectures are between 1 ½ and 2 ½ hours in length. Reading assignments parallel the lectures. After watching the lecture and reading the assigned supporting files, you will answer a brief series of short essay review questions (which are in the review questions file on the course web site). The answered questions are then e-mailed to the instructor. You and the instructor will discuss each unit via e-mail chat after your answers are assessed. There is no need to complete the discussion with the instructor before proceeding to the succeeding lecture & chapters. It is expected that all review questions will be answered correctly and completely by the student. Any questions answered incorrectly or incompletely must be discussed and/or corrected. You will have at least one real-time meeting with the instructor via a web based program such as “go to meeting” during which you will interact around your new skills.

Accessibility: Hearing impaired people can view the slides only as virtually all of the material presented in the lectures is typed onto the slides. Visually impaired people can concentrate on the verbal lectures as the slide material is repeated in the lecture accompanying each slide.

Accessing course materials: All course materials are available on the course web site. When you purchase the course, you will be given instructions for accessing the course web site immediately.

Computer and Computer Knowledge Requirements:  Anybody with a modern computer and a bit of basic understanding of computer operation (at the level of being able to send e-mails) can play this course with minimal problems. You must have a computer (a) capable of connecting to the internet and running a typical internet program, (b) containing/running a modern word processor such as Microsoft word or Word Perfect, (c) the capability to play sounds such as music (has speakers and appropriate software which normally come with any modern computer), and (d) a slide viewing program such as Power Point (you can probably get a slide viewing program free off the internet if you don’t have one). Any modern (e.g., built within the last ten years), IBM style computer running Windows 98 and more recent platforms (e.g., XP or Windows 8) should be able to do this. Speed, hard disk size, and RAM are not factors for computers in the above category.

Dozens of students have used recent Apple products (MACs etc.) for the course however they frequently have more difficulty playing the course materials than PC users do.

If you are using a MAC type of computer, you must have a current version of “quicktime”. If you do not have it, you can download it for free from the web.

Prerequisites & professional training requirements: You should have had undergraduate courses in general biology and general psychology prior to taking this course. If you haven’t had them, contact us before registering. You will do much better in the course if you have already taken our “introduction to psychophysiology” and “Anatomy and Physiology for Behavioral Clinicians” courses. This course is intended for licensed / certified clinicians. None of the instructional material offered will provide you with the clinical skills needed to apply the psychophysiological assessment and interventional techniques you will learn in the clinical environment unless you are already a trained clinician.

Reading:

Required: (Cost of the texts is not included in the course fee.)

a. Schwartz M and Andraskik F: Biofeedback a Practitioner’s Guide. All of section VIII (elimination disorders), Guilford Press, New York, 2003. ISBN 1-57230-845-1

b.  Laycock J and Haslam J: Therapeutic Management of Incontinence and Pelvic Pain. Springer, New York, 2002. ISBN 1852332247 (soft cover).

c.  Compendium of articles and protocols provided on the course website.

  Optional:

a. Dorey G: Conservative treatment of male urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Whurr Publishers, Phhiladelphia & London, 2001.  ISBN 1-86156-302-7.

(Note: If you work with males, it is very worth your while to get this small book!)

b. Newman D: Managing and treating urinary incontinence. Health Professions Press, Maryland, 2002.  ISBN 1-878812-82-3 (Very good book but you can get similar material from the two required texts.)

c. Brubaker L and Saclarides T: The female pelvic floor. F.A. Davis, Philadelphia, 1996.  ISBN 0-8036-0075-5  (Excellent book but you can get similar material from the two required texts.)

Faculty: The course is given by Dr. Richard Sherman, Ph.D.  He is certified by BCIA, approved by BCIA to teach the general biofeedback certification course, and currently teaches A&P, Pelvic floor disorders, pain, and other courses. He is a professional psychophysiologist with extensive training (his Ph.D. is in biology & psychology), has nearly 30 years of experience in the field, and has published over 130 books, chapters, and articles (mostly in peer reviewed journals). Dr. Sherman is Director of the psychophysiology doctoral specialization at Saybrook University and has held many positions within the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback including president. Full CV available upon request and on the course web site.

Practicum and mentored biofeedback training: This course covers only the didactic portion of the material required to be competent in performing behavioral interventions for pelvic floor disorders. It is crucial that everybody intending to perform behavioral interventions for pelvic floor dysfunctions (1) hands on training in use of the biofeedback devices, (2) observe patients being treated for those dysfunctions of interest, and (3) receive mentoring while performing initial interventions. For BCIA (Biofeedback Certification Institute of America) certification in “pelvic muscle dysfunction biofeedback” in addition to a course in anatomy and physiology, 4 hours of practicum training in use of biofeedback equipment and observation of patient treatment are required along with 48 hours of mentored biofeedback. The mentoring consists of 30 hours of clinical training in EMG and behavioral interventions, 12 hours of direct clinical supervision, and 6 hours of case conference.

You may want to contact us for information about getting this crucial training and mentoring.

Limits to the depth of information provided by this course:

  Anatomy and Physiology Course: Anyone intending to perform behavioral treatments of pelvic floor dysfunctions needs to know the basic elements of human anatomy and physiology (A&P). For example, the effects of stress, hormones, bone remodeling, bone disorders, etc on the dysfunctions to be treated can’t be covered in sufficient depth in this course. BCIA requires an undergraduate A&P course for certification. We offer a BCIA approved, distance based A&P course which emphasizes the material you need to know to enhance you competence in providing behavioral interventions. Information about the course can be found on our web site.

  General Biofeedback Course: This is not a course in general biofeedback. Thus, although you will learn all you need to about the correct application of muscle tension and pneumatic biofeedback to the pelvic floor. But you will not learn (a) how to perform other types of biofeedback such as temperature and breath control training which may be needed if the person is vasoconstricting so much or breathing so incorrectly they can’t attend to what you are trying to do due to anxiety, etc. or (2)  associated behavioral techniques such as relaxation training which may be needed to reduce levels of anxiety so high the patient can’t learn the skills you are trying to teach or may be so tense all over they may not be able to control the pelvic floor. Thus, if you haven’t had a general biofeedback course, you may want to take one.

Pain Course: This is not a general course on pain assessment and intervention from a psychophysiological perspective. This course provides an overview of psychophysiological pain assessment and intervention sufficient for you to do a competent job assessing and providing interventions for simple pelvic floor related pain problems but it doesn’t have the depth to give you an overall picture of how pain in other parts of the body relates to the pelvic floor, etc. This means you won’t know enough at the end of this course to competently assess pain problems referring to or influencing the pelvic floor. Nor will you know the overall elements of pain assessment and intervention. If you are going to work with pain in the pelvic floor, you should consider taking a course in pain psychophysiology.

Detailed Contents of each topic with associated audiovisual talks and readings

Note that in accordance with BCIA requirements, this course includes at least the following number of hours of education in the following topics scattered through all of the lectures: Applied Psychophysiology & Biofeedback 6 hours; Pelvic Floor Anatomy 6 hours, Surface EMG Assessment of Pelvic Floor Musculature 6, Clinical Practice Procedures 6 hours; Clinical Disorders I, Bladder Dysfunction 6 hours; Clinical Disorders II, Bowel Dysfunction 6 hours; Clinical Disorders III, Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndromes 6 hours, Ethical considerations 3 hours.

1. Overview of behavioral assessment and intervention for pelvic floor disorders:

(About three hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)

Elimination disorders treated with biofeedback assisted behavioral therapy, history of biofeedback and behavioral modalities used for pelvic floor disorders, assessing credibility of behavioral interventions for pelvic floor disorders, etc.

Audiovisual Lectures 1.1 and 1.2 – Introduction;   Audiovisual Lecture 1.3 – Assessing Credibility

(Note that people who have taken the Behavioral Medicine R&T Foundation or UNM’s

courses in either pain assessment or general biofeedback are exempt from lecture 1.3)

Laycock & Haslam 1; Optional Newman 1 and 2; PFD biofeedback chapter 2. Anatomy and Physiology of the Pelvic Floor

(About six hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)

Audiovisual Lectures 2.1 and 2.2

a. Anatomy and physiology of pelvic floor structures (pelvic floor muscle, bones, diaphragms, sphincters, smooth vs. striated muscle)

Laycock & Haslam 2, 5, 28 – 30

A&P of the male lower urinary tract

Optional Newman 2 and 3; Optional Dorey ch 2

Anatomy of the penis / physiology of erections

b. Urological A&P (urine storage and maturation, bladder anatomy, normal bladder storage and emptying, somatic and autonomic enervation)

types of urinary incontinence, dyssynergia

Laycock & Haslam 3

differences between male and female urinary incontinence

Optional Dorey Chapter 5

c. Prostate conditions

Optional Dorey ch 4

d A&P of digestive structures and processes, stool continence, defecation, somatic and autonomic enervation.  Laycock & Haslam 20 – 22

Optional Newman 5

3. Principles of applied psychophysiology biofeedback as applied to the pelvic floor

(About six hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)

Audiovisual Lectures 3.1 – 3.6; Movie 1

(Note: Anyone who took the pain or general biofeedback course given by either the Behavioral Medicine R&T Foundation of the UNM is exempt from this section.)

PFD muscle tension exercise file.

a. Introduction to biofeedback (definitions, history, overview of modalities, concepts of feedback and control in biological systems, principles of human learning as applied to biofeedback)

b. Surface EMG Instrumentation (terms and concepts, sources of artifact, sensor placement including skin preparation, distance between sensors and typical sites, EMG factors affecting assessment and interpretation such as fat, posture, etc., signal processing and feedback displays)

c. Biofeedback and distress (stress and the biopsychosocial model of illness, stressful life events and the risk of illness, psychophysiological reactions to stressful events)

d. Neuromuscular relaxation training (techniques assisted by EMG biofeedback such as autogenic training, hypnosis, meditation, etc., integrating relaxation into daily life, overview of other psychophysiological modalities used for neuromuscular relaxation such as heart rate variability, thermal biofeedback, EEG, GSR, etc.)

4. Know what is normal before you try to fix it

(About two hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)

Lack of understanding normal levels and patterns of muscle function, patters and rates of urination, defecation, lubrication, erection etc. has led many people to think they are abnormal and many therapists to try changing a normal system resulting in abnormal functioning and pain.

Audiovisual Lecture 4

5. Assessments and interventions for urinary incontinence

(About six hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)

Audiovisual Lectures 5.1, 5.2, 5.4, 5.6, and 5.8; Protocols and patient handouts; Movies 2 and 3

a. Overview of physiological basis for and testing for urinary disorders (varieties of bladder disorders such as stress and urge incontinence dyssynergia, etc., overview of medical diagnostic procedures, urodynamics)

Schwartz & Andrasik 26; Laycock & Haslam 4, 6, and 16;   Optional Newman 6

b. Physical assessments

c. Urodynamics

  d. Surface EMG pelvic floor muscle assessment (vaginal and rectal surface EMG placements, infection control, protocols for evaluation, baselines, phasic and tonic muscle testing, endurance, dyssynergia testing, data interpretation)

e. Exercise and Surface EMG based pelvic floor training

f. Treatment options not involving biofeedback

Laycock & Haslam 8 , 9, 11 – 15, 17 – 19; Optional Newman 7, 8, 9, and 10;   Optional Dorey chapter 8

Exercises, Cones / weights, Electrical stimulation, Lifestyle changes, Bladder training for urge incontinence, Medications for urge incontinence, Pads, Appliances, Penile clamps, Prosthetic devices, inserts, Plugs, Surgery, Fluid Control, Skin care for incontinence dermatitis, Intermittent self-catheterization, and Artificial urinary sphincter (d 83/4)

g. EMG instrumentation options (sensors, SEMG instruments, home training devices)

Laycock & Haslam 10

h. Preparation for clinical practice (patient education in biofeedback and relevant A&P, patient intake, communication with other health care providers)

i. Medical and behavioral treatment modalities – urologic (neuromuscular reeducation and exercise assisted by vaginal/rectal SEMG and other SEMG placements for bladder disorders – uptraining, downtraining, coordination training), other behavioral techniques including urge suppression techniques, bladder retraining, electrical stimulation, etc., non-behavioral techniques including drugs, surgery, electrical, physical interventions, etc.)

6. Assessments and interventions for bowel dysfunctions

(About six hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)

Audiovisual Lectures 6.1 and 6.2; Schwartz & Andrasik 27 & 29; Laycock & Haslam 20 – 22

a. Physiological basis for and testing for GI disorders (GI disorders including fecal incontinence, constipation, dyssynergia, irritable bowel syndrome, and colonic inertia, medical diagnostic procedures including manometric and defocograraphic evaluation and transit time studies)

b. GI Medical and behavioral treatment modalities (neuromuscular reeducation and therapeutic exercise assisted by vaginal/rectal surface EMG and other EMG placements for bowel disorders including uptraining, downtraining, coordination training, and bowel sensory awareness training, other behavioral methods specific to bowel disorders, non-behavioral interventions including surgery medications, physical interventions)

7. Principles of pain assessment and intervention from a psychophysiological perspective

(About six hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)

Audiovisual Lecture 7.1 – 7.7

(Note: Anyone who took the pain course given by either the Behavioral Medicine R&T Foundation of the UNM is exempt from this section.)

Physiological basis of pelvic pain disorders (psychophysiological basis of pain, basic pain mechanisms related to pelvic pain, pain – stress – muscle tension relationships, trauma)

8. Assessments and interventions for pelvic pain syndromes

(About five hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)

Audiovisual Lecture 8.1, 8.2, & 8.3;  Schwartz & Andrasik 28; Laycock & Haslam 23 – 27

a. Physiological basis of pain syndromes related to pelvic floor dysfunction (chronic pelvic pain syndromes including vulvodinia, proctalgia fugax, levator ani; co-morbidities including irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis)

b. Pelvic pain syndromes unique (mostly) to males: (prostatitis, orchialgia, penile pain, prostatodynia, perineal pain, testicular cancer related pain, proctalgia fugax)

Optional Dorey ch 6

c. Medical and behavioral treatment modalities for pelvic area pain (neuromuscular reeducation, posture, dietary counseling, drugs, surgery, physical interventions, sexual history taking and counseling)

9. Assessments and interventions for erectile dysfunction: Audiovisual Lecture 9

(About two hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)

a. Overview of erectile dysfunction

b. Assessment

c. treatment

(1) alternative (electrical stimulation, herbs, acupuncture)

(2) drug based (antianxiety, vasodilators)

(3) surgical (repair or replace)

(4) behavioral (education, counseling, fantasizing, exercises, biofeedback, life   style)

10. Ethical considerations in performing behavioral assessments and interventions for pelvic floor disorders

(About three hours of instruction including interaction with the instructor.)

Overview of ethical principles of biofeedback as well as practice limitations and referral guidelines. Audiovisual lectures 10.1 and 10.2

Read files entitled “PFD BCIA ethics document” and “additions”.

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14. Biological Basis of Behavior / Introduction to Psychophysiology

45 CEs, Course Fee $750

Rounded Rectangle: Order now!Course Concept and Description: This course is the equivalent of a three credit course and provides 45 hours of CE credit. Students learn by watching audiovisual lectures, reading assignments from materials provided on the course web site and standard texts, and interacting with their instructor via e-mail. They answer short essay questions after each lecture rather than taking exams. Previous students have found that this course takes between 45 and 95 hours of actual work to complete.

This course explores the manifold ways the brain and body work together to produce behavior and the cycle between behavior and physiology. The course begins with a description of the body’s organizational structure and genetics as related to behavior. The basic physiological ways information is received from the external and internal environments through a variety of sensors and then processed by the hormonal / nervous system are described. Typical psychophysiological dysfunctions and interventions are also described.  You should have taken undergraduate biology and psychology before taking this course.

Learning Objectives: Students will understand how the field relates to human activities, evolution and Behavioral Genetics – evolution of behavior and communication, genetics of behavior, anatomy and physiology of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems, hormones and behavior – pheromones, sex, nerve – hormone interactions, mechanisms of Sensation/Perception – vision, hearing, touch (pain, electrical), smell, taste,   balance/location, etc., motor control systems, eating and drinking disorders, biological rhythms and sleep, mechanisms of drug addiction,  learning, Language, and Memory, the Malfunctioning Brain, emotions – stress, aggression, mental illness, and psychophysiological dysfunctions and interventions. They will learn to integrate these principles into their patient interactions to improve clinical outcomes.

Format: Home study supported by e-mail chats after each unit is completed. The lecture portion of the course is presented through a series of audiovisual lectures profusely illustrated by power-point slides. Reading assignments in the Pinel book parallel the lectures. There are no lectures for a few of the topics. After watching the lecture and reading the chapters, you will answer a brief series of questions. The answered questions are then e-mailed to the instructor. You and the instructor will discuss each unit via e-mail chat after your answers are assessed.

Accessing course materials: All course materials are available on the course web site. When you purchase the course, you will be given instructions for accessing the course web site immediately.

Computer and Computer Knowledge Requirements:  Anybody with a modern computer and a bit of basic understanding of computer operation (at the level of being able to send e-mails) can play this course with minimal problems. You must have a computer (a) capable of connecting to the internet and running a typical internet program, (b) containing/running a modern word processor such as Microsoft word or Word Perfect, (c) the capability to play sounds such as music (has speakers and appropriate software which normally come with any modern computer), and (d) a slide viewing program such as Power Point (you can probably get a slide viewing program free off the internet if you don’t have one). Any modern (e.g., built within the last ten years), IBM style computer running Windows 98 and more recent platforms (e.g., XP or Windows 8) should be able to do this. Speed, hard disk size, and RAM are not factors for computers in the above category.

Dozens of students have used recent Apple products (MACs etc.) for the course however they frequently have more difficulty playing the course materials than PC users do.

If you are using a MAC type of computer, you must have a current version of “quicktime”. If you do not have it, you can download it for free from the web.

Faculty: The course is given by Dr. Richard Sherman, Ph.D.  He is certified by BCIA, approved by BCIA to teach the general biofeedback certification course, and currently teaches A&P, Pelvic floor disorders, pain, and other courses. He is a professional psychophysiologist with extensive training (his Ph.D. is in biology & psychology), has nearly 30 years of experience in the field, and has published over 130 books, chapters, and articles (mostly in peer reviewed journals). Dr. Sherman is Director of the psychophysiology doctoral specialization at Saybrook University and has held many positions within the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback including president. Full CV available upon request and on the course web site.

Required Text: Cost of the text is not included in the cost of the course.

Pinel, John P.J., Biopsychology – 6th or 7th edition.  2005 / 7; Published by Pearson of Boston & New York.ISBN 0-205-42651-4. You may also use the 5th edition (2003) Needham Heights, MA:  Allyn, & Bacon ,ISBN 0-205-34984-6.

Topics we will cover (Note: Each topic corresponds to one set of review questions.):

      1. Definitions and Concepts – what is this field and how does it relate to the rest of the world?   (Lecture 1; Pinel chapter 1)
      2. Credibility of Information – research techniques, recognizing bad science (Lectures 2, 2.1, 2.2; Pinel chapters 1 and 5)
      3. Evolution and Behavioral Genetics – evolution of behavior and communication, genetics of   behavior (Lecture 2.6; Pinel chapter 2)
      4. Anatomy and Physiology of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems – stomach brain,   plastic homunculus  (Lectures 3, 3.1, 3.2; Pinel chapters 3, 4, 8, 9, and 10)
      5. Hormones and Behavior – pheromones, sex, nerve – hormone interactions (Lecture 3.6; Pinel chapter 13)
      6. Mechanisms of Sensation/Perception – vision, hearing, touch (pain, electrical), smell, taste,   balance/location, etc. (Lectures 4, 4.1; Pinel chapters 6 & 7)
      7. Motor control systems – (Lecture 4.4; Pinel chapter 8)
      8. Eating and Drinking – balance and disorders (Lecture 4.6; Pinel chapter 12)
      9. Biological Rhythms and Sleep (Lecture 4.8; Pinel chapter 14)
      10. Drug Addiction (Lecture 5; Pinel chapter 15)
      11. Learning, Language, and Memory  (Lecture 5.4; Pinel chapters 11 & 16)
      12. The Malfunctioning Brain  (Lecture 5.6; Pinel chapters 10 & 18)
      13. Emotions – stress, aggression, mental illness  (Lecture 6; Pinel chapters 17 and 18)
      14. Psychophysiological interventions  (Lectures 9, 9.2, 9.4)

When all requirements have been successfully completed, your course completion certificate will be e-mailed to you and BCIA will be informed that you completed the course.

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